EUS Faculty

Christopher Lindner

Christopher Lindner

Archaeology
Office: Hopson 303
Phone: 845-758-7299
E-mail: lindner@bard.edu


AB, Hamilton College, with year abroad at University of Paris; MA, University of Cincinnati; PhD, Albany University

Archaeological projects at Bard, with students as technicians, average once a year as cultural resource investigations, a part of the College’s environmental impact assessment in advance of its major ground disturbances for buildings, pavings, etc. Lindner designs exhibits about this work, such as the ‘Gardener’s Lodge’ panel on Blithewood Avenue, ‘Bardaeology’ in the upstairs Hegeman hallway, and rotating displays at the Library. The Bard Lands have become the most archaeologically known terrain in this region of New York. They figure prominently in a 2011 chapter by Lindner in The Environmental History of the Hudson Valley, a book published by State University of New York press. A result of his long-term study for the NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation is the panel Archaeology of Fishing along the Estuary on the Greenway Trail at the edge of Tivoli South Bay. It is also curated as an online exhibit on the website: inside.bard.edu/archaeology. Its poster, developed in conjunction with the Mohican studies group of the Native American Institute affiliated with the New York State Museum, is used in the local schools, with curricula Lindner designed with teachers to foster stewardship of archaeological sites. Lindner’s fall lab science course ‘Field Methods in Environmental Archaeology’ provides Bard students experience in Cultural Resource Management [CRM], the field in which most current practitioners work. His spring humanities course ‘Historical Archaeology’ has its focus on adaptations in the Bard area over the last three centuries, particularly in regard to the first substantial German American settlement on this continent. Its results are the present center frame of the website above. A collaborative project with the Germantown history department and library has stimulated community awareness, with the result of local grant-funded summer field schools in historical archaeology and multiple exhibits to display discoveries. A similar project with the Black History Committee of the Dutchess County Historical Society has explored Guineatown in Hyde Park, an African American community around 200 years ago. A summary of its findings will appear as a chapter in the forthcoming book Race in the Northeast: Archaeological Studies of Racialization, Identity, and Memory to be published by the Society for Historical Archaeology. Lindner served as president of the New York Archaeological Council, the state’s professional organization that mediates the practice of CRM within the NYS Environmental Quality Review Act. He led the local site preservation NGO, Hudson River Heritage, in its long-term effort to protect against inappropriate development near the waterfront for 16 miles with Bard at its center. He has worked as consultant for local citizen groups; municipalities, such as the towns of Rhinebeck and Pine Plains; and the National Park Service at the Roosevelt estate in Hyde Park.