EUS Events

+ EUS News

 

Upcoming Events


Informational Webinar: Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Tuesday, September 11, 2018
7:30 pm – 8:30 pm Online

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
        

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds online informational webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy programs. 

ABOUT
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Join a live information session with Director Goodstein and the admissions team and ask questions directly of the Bard team. 

WHAT WILL BE COVERED?  

  • Overview of graduate program offerings
  • Alumni success and career outcomes
  • Admissions information
  • Prerequisite course requirements
  • Peace Corps and AmeriCorps programs
  • Financial aid availability
  • Tips for a standout application 
DEGREE OPTIONS
Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability
 
Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School 
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching 
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability 

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve) 
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)  

A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. Email Caitlin O'Donnell for further details.
For more information, call 845-758-7073.

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Informational Webinar: Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Tuesday, October 9, 2018
7:30 pm – 8:30 pm Online

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
        

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds online informational webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy programs. 

ABOUT
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Join a live information session with Director Goodstein and the admissions team and ask questions directly of the Bard team. 

WHAT WILL BE COVERED?  

  • Overview of graduate program offerings
  • Alumni success and career outcomes
  • Admissions information
  • Prerequisite course requirements
  • Peace Corps and AmeriCorps programs
  • Financial aid availability
  • Tips for a standout application 
DEGREE OPTIONS
Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability
 
Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School 
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching 
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability 

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve) 
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)  

A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. Email Caitlin O'Donnell for further details.
For more information, call 845-758-7073.

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Informational Webinar: Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Tuesday, October 30, 2018
7:30 pm – 8:30 pm Online

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
        

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds online informational webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy programs. 

ABOUT
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Join a live information session with Director Goodstein and the admissions team and ask questions directly of the Bard team. 

WHAT WILL BE COVERED?  

  • Overview of graduate program offerings
  • Alumni success and career outcomes
  • Admissions information
  • Prerequisite course requirements
  • Peace Corps and AmeriCorps programs
  • Financial aid availability
  • Tips for a standout application 
DEGREE OPTIONS
Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability
 
Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School 
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching 
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability 

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve) 
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)  

A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. Email Caitlin O'Donnell for further details.
For more information, call 845-758-7073.

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability: Open House in New York City

Wednesday, November 14, 2018
6:30 pm – 8:30 pm LMHQ NYC

Attendees receive a $65 application fee waiver! RSVP: HERE

Join us in New York City for an Open House hosted by the Bard MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy.

Attendees will hear from a panel of current students and alumni of Bard's MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy. Our Panel of student/alum experts will discuss topics such as:

  • career outcomes -- how the MS degrees at CEP and MBA in Sustainability have led to impactful sustainability careers
  • the program experience -- highlights on courses and key features at Bard (including the NYCLab course and the CEP internship)
  • how to get the most of your graduate school journey -- career development + student engagement opportunities at Bard
  • how to make your application stand out -- tips on perfecting your application materials, advice on getting through the graduate school admissions process
In addition: Program Director Eban Goodstein will provide an overview of the program offerings at Bard CEP and the MBA in Sustainability.

Our Admissions staff will also be on hand to provide information on the application process and answer questions regarding:
  • how to complete and submit your application
  • financial aid opportunities
  • successfully completing program prerequisites 

Event Location: This event will be held at LMHQ, 150 Broadway NY, NY Floor 20

Email Caitlin O'Donnell with any additional questions.

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability: Open House at Bard College

Saturday, December 1, 2018
11:00 am – 2:00 pm Reem-Kayden Center

Attendees receive a $65 application fee waiver! RSVP: HERE

Join us at Bard College in the Hudson Valley for an Open House hosted by the Bard MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy.

Attendees will hear from a panel of current students and alumni of Bard's MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy. Our Panel of student/alum experts will discuss topics such as:

  • career outcomes -- how the MS degrees at CEP and MBA in Sustainability have led to impactful sustainability careers
  • the program experience -- highlights on courses and key features at Bard (including the NYCLab course and the CEP internship)
  • how to get the most of your graduate school journey -- career development + student engagement opportunities at Bard
  • how to make your application stand out -- tips on perfecting your application materials, advice on getting through the graduate school admissions process
In addition: Program Director Eban Goodstein will provide an overview of the program offerings at Bard CEP and the MBA in Sustainability.

Our Admissions staff will also be on hand to provide information on the application process and answer questions regarding:
  • how to complete and submit your application
  • financial aid opportunities
  • successfully completing program prerequisites 

Event Location: This event will be held on Bard College's Hudson Valley campus located at 30 Campus Rd. Annandale-on-Hudson, NY. 

Email Caitlin O'Donnell with any additional questions.

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Informational Webinar: Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Tuesday, December 11, 2018
7:30 pm – 8:30 pm Online

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
        

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds online informational webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy programs. 

ABOUT
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Join a live information session with Director Goodstein and the admissions team and ask questions directly of the Bard team. 

WHAT WILL BE COVERED?  

  • Overview of graduate program offerings
  • Alumni success and career outcomes
  • Admissions information
  • Prerequisite course requirements
  • Peace Corps and AmeriCorps programs
  • Financial aid availability
  • Tips for a standout application 
DEGREE OPTIONS
Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability
 
Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School 
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching 
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability 

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve) 
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)  

A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. Email Caitlin O'Donnell for further details.
For more information, call 845-758-7073.

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Informational Webinar: Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Tuesday, January 8, 2019
7:30 pm – 8:30 pm Online

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
        

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds online informational webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy programs. 

ABOUT
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Join a live information session with Director Goodstein and the admissions team and ask questions directly of the Bard team. 

WHAT WILL BE COVERED?  

  • Overview of graduate program offerings
  • Alumni success and career outcomes
  • Admissions information
  • Prerequisite course requirements
  • Peace Corps and AmeriCorps programs
  • Financial aid availability
  • Tips for a standout application 
DEGREE OPTIONS
Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability
 
Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School 
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching 
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability 

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve) 
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)  

A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. Email Caitlin O'Donnell for further details.

For more information, call 845-758-7073.

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Informational Webinar: Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Tuesday, February 12, 2019
7:30 pm – 8:30 pm Online

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
        

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds online informational webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy programs. 

ABOUT
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Join a live information session with Director Goodstein and the admissions team and ask questions directly of the Bard team. 

WHAT WILL BE COVERED?  

  • Overview of graduate program offerings
  • Alumni success and career outcomes
  • Admissions information
  • Prerequisite course requirements
  • Peace Corps and AmeriCorps programs
  • Financial aid availability
  • Tips for a standout application 
DEGREE OPTIONS
Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability
 
Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School 
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching 
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability 

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve) 
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)  

A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. Email Caitlin O'Donnell for further details.
For more information, call 845-758-7073.

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability: Open House in New York City

Wednesday, February 20, 2019
6:30 pm – 8:30 pm LMHQ NYC

Attendees receive a $65 application fee waiver! RSVP: HERE

Join us in New York City for an Open House hosted by the Bard MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy.

Attendees will hear from a panel of current students and alumni of Bard's MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy. Our Panel of student/alum experts will discuss topics such as:

  • career outcomes -- how the MS degrees at CEP and MBA in Sustainability have led to impactful sustainability careers
  • the program experience -- highlights on courses and key features at Bard (including the NYCLab course and the CEP internship)
  • how to get the most of your graduate school journey -- career development + student engagement opportunities at Bard
  • how to make your application stand out -- tips on perfecting your application materials, advice on getting through the graduate school admissions process
In addition: Program Director Eban Goodstein will provide an overview of the program offerings at Bard CEP and the MBA in Sustainability.

Our Admissions staff will also be on hand to provide information on the application process and answer questions regarding:
  • how to complete and submit your application
  • financial aid opportunities
  • successfully completing program prerequisites 

Event Location: This event will be held at LMHQ, 150 Broadway NY, NY Floor 20

Email Caitlin O'Donnell with any additional questions.

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability: Open House at Bard College

Saturday, March 2, 2019
11:00 am – 2:00 pm Reem-Kayden Center

Attendees receive a $65 application fee waiver! RSVP: HERE

Join us at Bard College in the Hudson Valley for an Open House hosted by the Bard MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy.

Attendees will hear from a panel of current students and alumni of Bard's MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy. Our Panel of student/alum experts will discuss topics such as:

  • career outcomes -- how the MS degrees at CEP and MBA in Sustainability have led to impactful sustainability careers
  • the program experience -- highlights on courses and key features at Bard (including the NYCLab course and the CEP internship)
  • how to get the most of your graduate school journey -- career development + student engagement opportunities at Bard
  • how to make your application stand out -- tips on perfecting your application materials, advice on getting through the graduate school admissions process
In addition: Program Director Eban Goodstein will provide an overview of the program offerings at Bard CEP and the MBA in Sustainability.

Our Admissions staff will also be on hand to provide information on the application process and answer questions regarding:
  • how to complete and submit your application
  • financial aid opportunities
  • successfully completing program prerequisites 

Event Location: This event will be held on Bard College's Hudson Valley campus located at 30 Campus Rd. Annandale-on-Hudson, NY. 

Email Caitlin O'Donnell with any additional questions.

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Informational Webinar: Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Tuesday, March 12, 2019
7:30 pm – 8:30 pm Online

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
        

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds online informational webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy programs. 

ABOUT
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Join a live information session with Director Goodstein and the admissions team and ask questions directly of the Bard team. 

WHAT WILL BE COVERED?  

  • Overview of graduate program offerings
  • Alumni success and career outcomes
  • Admissions information
  • Prerequisite course requirements
  • Peace Corps and AmeriCorps programs
  • Financial aid availability
  • Tips for a standout application 
DEGREE OPTIONS
Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability
 
Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School 
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching 
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability 

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve) 
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)  

A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. Email Caitlin O'Donnell for further details.
For more information, call 845-758-7073.

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Informational Webinar: Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Tuesday, April 9, 2019
7:30 pm – 8:30 pm Online

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
        

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds online informational webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy programs. 

ABOUT
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Join a live information session with Director Goodstein and the admissions team and ask questions directly of the Bard team. 

WHAT WILL BE COVERED?  

  • Overview of graduate program offerings
  • Alumni success and career outcomes
  • Admissions information
  • Prerequisite course requirements
  • Peace Corps and AmeriCorps programs
  • Financial aid availability
  • Tips for a standout application 
DEGREE OPTIONS
Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability
 
Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School 
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching 
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability 

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve) 
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)  

A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. Email Caitlin O'Donnell for further details.
For more information, call 845-758-7073.

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability: Open House in New York City

Wednesday, April 10, 2019
6:30 pm – 8:30 pm LMHQ NYC

Attendees receive a $65 application fee waiver! RSVP: HERE

Join us in New York City for an Open House hosted by the Bard MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy.

Attendees will hear from a panel of current students and alumni of Bard's MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy. Our Panel of student/alum experts will discuss topics such as:

  • career outcomes -- how the MS degrees at CEP and MBA in Sustainability have led to impactful sustainability careers
  • the program experience -- highlights on courses and key features at Bard (including the NYCLab course and the CEP internship)
  • how to get the most of your graduate school journey -- career development + student engagement opportunities at Bard
  • how to make your application stand out -- tips on perfecting your application materials, advice on getting through the graduate school admissions process
In addition: Program Director Eban Goodstein will provide an overview of the program offerings at Bard CEP and the MBA in Sustainability.

Our Admissions staff will also be on hand to provide information on the application process and answer questions regarding:
  • how to complete and submit your application
  • financial aid opportunities
  • successfully completing program prerequisites 

Event Location: This event will be held at LMHQ, 150 Broadway NY, NY Floor 20

Email Caitlin O'Donnell with any additional questions.

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Informational Webinar: Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Tuesday, May 7, 2019
7:30 pm – 8:30 pm Online

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
        

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds online informational webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy programs. 

ABOUT
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Join a live information session with Director Goodstein and the admissions team and ask questions directly of the Bard team. 

WHAT WILL BE COVERED?  

  • Overview of graduate program offerings
  • Alumni success and career outcomes
  • Admissions information
  • Prerequisite course requirements
  • Peace Corps and AmeriCorps programs
  • Financial aid availability
  • Tips for a standout application 
DEGREE OPTIONS
Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability
 
Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School 
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching 
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability 

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve) 
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)  

A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. Email Caitlin O'Donnell for further details.
For more information, call 845-758-7073.

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

 

Archive of Past Events

                      

2016

Thursday, December 15, 2016

EUS Food Systems Practicum (Day 2)

Student Project Presentations
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  All are welcome to student presentations outlining specific plans to strengthen the food system at Bard.

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Informational Webinar: Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
Online  Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds online informational webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA and CEP programs.

Webinar Link: https://bluejeans.com/796084533
Code: 796084533

What will be covered?
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Details on attending a webinar...
No registration is required. To join simply click on the webinar link 5 minutes before the start time of the webinar you wish to attend, and enter your Full Name. A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. Email Caitlin O'Donnell for further details.

Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability

Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve)
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

EUS Food Systems Practicum (Day 1)

Student Project Presentations
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  All are welcome to student presentations outlining specific plans to strengthen the food system at Bard.

Friday, December 9, 2016

The Anthropologist

Film screening and director conversation
Upstate Films  If you're interested in transportation there, please contact Tom!

Message from a Bard alum organizing this film screening:

On Friday December 9th, we're showing a film called THE ANTHROPOLOGIST at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck. Director Seth Kramer will be there for a q&a following the screening. It's a GREAT film that follows environmental anthropologist Susan Crate around the world as she investigates how societies are forced to negotiate the disruption of their ways of life as a result of climate change. 

You can find a full description of the film here on Upstate's website, or at the bottom of this email: http://upstatefilms.org/coming-soon/the_anthropologist

Friday, December 9, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Thursday, December 8, 2016

Dams large and small: ecosystem impacts on the world’s tropical river systems

speaker Dr. Steve HamiltonMichigan State University - Kellogg Biological Station
Cary Institute auditorium. 2801 Sharon Turnpike (Route 44), Millbrook, NY  hosted by Dr. Emma Rosi-Marshall

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability:
Open House in New York City

Attendees receive a $65 application fee waiver!
New York City  Join us in New York City for an Open House hosted by the Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability. Admissions staff, faculty, and current students will be on hand to provide an overview of the programs offered, answer questions, and share tips on how to make your application stand out. 

REGISTER HERE

This event will be held in our New York City classroom located at LMHQ, 150 Broadway, New York, NY 10038.

Email Caitlin O'Donnell with any questions.

 

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Saw Kill Watershed Community

Community Meeting about local water science, recreation, education, and stewardship!
Red Hook Town Hall  The Saw Kill Watershed Community (SKWC) protects the Saw Kill watershed and its ecological, recreational, and historic resources through hands-on science, education, and advocacy.

Who we are:
The Saw Kill Watershed Community was formed to unite folks who reside and work in Milan, Red Hook, Rhinebeck, and Annandale-on-Hudson who are interested in the protection and management of the Saw Kill and its watershed. Our group is made up of farmers, scientists, students, educators, sportsmen, historians, conservationists, municipal leaders, and many others (see our SKWC People page!). We have monthly meetings not only to discuss our progress but also to get input from members from the community on where help is needed and what we can do. Please join us in this community effort!

Saturday, December 3, 2016

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability: Hudson Valley Campus Open House

Attendees receive a $65 application fee waiver!
Reem-Kayden Center  Join us at Bard College in the Hudson Valley for an Open House hosted by the Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability. Admissions staff, faculty, and current students will be on hand to provide an overview of the programs offered, answer questions, and share tips on how to make your application stand out. 

REGISTER HERE

This event will be held in our Hudson Valley campus located at 30 Campus Rd. Annandale-on-Hudson, NY. 

Email Caitlin O'Donnell with any additional questions.

 

Friday, December 2, 2016

Organic Farming Opportunity in Japan

(A Call for Participants from Bard)
None  Students with an interest in organic farming practices are invited to work during the summer of 2017 at an organic farm in Japan. As part of the Henry Luce Foundation’s grant to support curricular innovation and study experiences related to East Asia and the Environment, this opportunity provides students with an exciting occasion to gain knowledge and hands-on experience with Japanese farming practices as well as to participate in cultural exchange and immersion.

Selected students will receive financial support in the amount of $1,500 to be used towards travel costs to Japan. Food and lodging are typically covered in exchange for working on the farm. Upon their return, students will be expected to write up a report on their organic farming practicum and share the experience and the knowledge that they have gained through presentations at a follow-up conference at the end of the grant term.

Students majoring in Asian Studies, and students majoring Environmental and Urban Studies with prior experience with farming (e.g., experience working on the Bard Farm) are especially encouraged to apply.

How to apply:
Interested students should send a brief statement of interest (1-2 pages) via email to Mika Endo (mendo@bard.edu) by 5:00 on Friday, December 2, 2016. In your statement, please include the following information:

1. Name
2. Year
3. Moderated? If yes, Program?
4. Prior experience working on a farm?
5. Prior experience with Japan?

Awards will be announced by the end of the Fall 2016 semester.

Friday, December 2, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Thursday, December 1, 2016

EUS Open House and Internship Presentations!

Learn about new courses, initiatives, recent student internships, and share a meal!
Hegeman 308  The EUS Open House is a time to meet EUS professors, hear about new courses, and prepare for registration. 

It's also a time to socialize with other EUS people--students, staff, and faculty--over a tasty local-ish meal!

Finally, students who have recently completed their EUS internships will present, giving you ideas on your internship(s) in the future!

Internships to be presented:

Dreamfields: Urban Innovator
Hudsonia: Painted Turtles Intern
Metropolitan District Commission: Environmental Education/career prep for HS students
Newark Downtown District (a business improvement district and urban planning firm in Newark, NJ): Urban Planning intern
Bard CEP: Power Dialog organizing, etc.
Kingston YMCA Farm: Food Distribution
Kingston Planning Office: Kingston Urban Planning
Arcosanti: Architectural Intern
Clearwater: Education Intern
Fudan University in Shanghai: Research Assistant studying water-air bacteria exchange
Laughing Wolf Farms in Mancos, Colorado: Market-Farm Intern

EUS Mission:
We aim to endow students with an in-depth, interdisciplinary understanding of the complexities of environmental and urban issues. The goal is to educate leaders who will design a sustainable future in built and natural environments.

Thursday, December 1, 2016

A Novel Role for Astrocytes in Hemorrhagic Stroke

Annalisa Scimemi
SUNY Albany
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Thursday, December 1, 2016

Consequences of integrating livestock and wildlife in an African savanna ecosystem

speaker Dr. Felicia Keesing - Bard College
Cary Institute auditorium. 2801 Sharon Turnpike (Route 44), Millbrook, NY  hosted by Dr. Richard Ostfeld

Friday, November 25, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

EUS Colloquium: John Ferguson - “Earthquake and Infectious Disease in Haiti: Natural Disasters?”


Olin Language Center 120  What are urban environmental disasters?  How natural are they, and to what extent are they caused by human ideations and actions? Why are certain populations more susceptible than others to environmental catastrophes? To what extent can scientific, technological, and engineering advances along with popular thought mediate urban disasters?   This colloquium is an invited speaker series, facilitated and supplemented by the instructor that will explore these issues.  Guest presenters will address these questions from historical, sociological, cultural, political/policy, economic, and other perspectives; in this way, students will be introduced to a variety of academic disciplinary approaches to environmental and urban studies.

Friday, November 18, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Using Molecular Biology Tools in Molecular Environmental Chemistry:
My Interdisciplinary Journey in Academia

Dr. Ludmilla Aristilde
Department of Biological & Environmental Engineering
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Cornell University
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Ecosystem services and management of freshwater ecosystems: opportunities and threats

A Scientific seminar with Dr. Vicenç Acuña, Catalan Institute for Water Research
Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies, 2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY 12545 

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Informational Webinar: Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
Online  Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds admission webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA and CEP programs.

Webinar Link: https://bluejeans.com/681064447

What will be covered?
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Details on attending a webinar...
No registration is required. To join simply click on the webinar link 5 minutes before the start time of the webinar you wish to attend, and enter your Full Name. A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. Email Caitlin O'Donnell for further details.

Webinar Link: https://bluejeans.com/681064447

Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability

Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve)
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

EUS Colloquium: Eli Dueker – “The Microbiology of Flooding:
Hurricane Sandy”


Olin Language Center 120  What are urban environmental disasters?  How natural are they, and to what extent are they caused by human ideations and actions? Why are certain populations more susceptible than others to environmental catastrophes? To what extent can scientific, technological, and engineering advances along with popular thought mediate urban disasters?   This colloquium is an invited speaker series, facilitated and supplemented by the instructor that will explore these issues.  Guest presenters will address these questions from historical, sociological, cultural, political/policy, economic, and other perspectives; in this way, students will be introduced to a variety of academic disciplinary approaches to environmental and urban studies.

Saturday, November 12, 2016

Before the Lease: Farm Choices for Landowners


Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, 2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY 12545  Join us as we hear from practitioners about the considerations landowners should be aware of when deciding what type of farming they would like to see on their land.

Friday, November 11, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Thursday, November 10, 2016

Bio-law-gy:
A Non-Traditional Career 
in the Law and Science

Wendy Nack-Lawlor 

Taconic Biosciences
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Thursday, November 10, 2016

Watersheds, airsheds, and the bacteria in between

speaker Dr. Eli Dueker - Bard College
Cary Institute auditorium. 2801 Sharon Turnpike (Route 44), Millbrook, NY  The production of aerosols from surface waters in marine and freshwater environments results in the transfer of aquatic materials (including nutrients, bacteria, and viral particles) to air. These materials can then be transported by onshore winds to land, representing a biogeochemical connection between aquatic and terrestrial systems not normally considered. The implications for this connection are broad ranging. For instance, in urban waterfront environments, this transfer could result in the emission of pathogenic bacteria and viral particles from contaminated waters into urban airspace, and, in rural waterfront environments, this transfer could result in the distribution of water-originated bacteria to soil and leaf surfaces. Recent research has also firmly established the need for better characterization of these exchanges as it relates to climate modeling since aerosolized bacteria can serve as efficient ice, fog, and cloud condensation nuclei, often at temperatures warmer than other aerosol particles. Despite the potential importance of this microbial link between water, air, and land, water-originating microbial aerosols are largely uncharacterized. Eli’s past research has shed light on the role of coastal fog, wind speeds, and aeration remediation on local water-air microbial exchange and microbial aerosol viability. He has recently begun to harness community science at the watershed level to further address the gaps in our scientific understanding of the water-air microbial transfer. Since science-based watershed communities are fast developing across the nation in response to crises in equitable access to clean drinking and recreational waters, Eli is bringing an airshed approach to these efforts using the bacterial aerosol connection as a bridge. If what’s in our water ends up in the air, we need to pay closer attention to science addressing emerging contaminants and sources for bacterial contamination on the watershed level. Furthermore, if bacteria do provide important ice nucleation services, our land use decisions don’t only affect the types of run-off our waterways receive, but they also may determine the types of microbial aerosols released into the air by water and land.

Bio
Eli Dueker is an Assistant Professor in the Biology & Environmental and Urban Studies Programs at Bard College, and a Visiting Researcher here at the Cary Institute. His research is currently focused on the bacterial connection between water quality and air quality. This work requires crossing scientific disciplines, re-imagining ecosystem boundaries, and ongoing engagement of watershed communities to better understand the role and fate of bacteria in all phases of the water cycle. Eli has also recently established the Saw Kill Watershed Community, which is a community-based group taking a scientific approach to watershed conservation and protection, and the Bard Water Lab, which is housed in the Bard Ecology Field Station and makes water science accessible to water communities regionally. 

We hope you can join us for Dr. Dueker’s seminar on November 10.

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Creative Action 
with 
Igor Vamos 
of 
the Yes Men!


Resnick Studio, Fisher Performing Arts Center  The Yes Men are an activist duo, Andy Bichlbaum and Mike Bonanno. Two guys who couldn't hold down a job until they became representatives of Exxon, Halliburton, Dow Chemical,and the U.S. federal government. As the Yes Men, they use humor, truth and lunacy to bring media attention to the crimes of our unwilling employers.

To date, the duo has produced three films: The Yes Men (2003), The Yes Men Fix the World (2009) and The Yes Men Are Revolting (2014).

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

EUS Colloquium: Dana Smith, - “Anatomy of a Local Disaster: Hurricane Irene in Poughkeepsie, NY”


Olin Language Center 120  What are urban environmental disasters?  How natural are they, and to what extent are they caused by human ideations and actions? Why are certain populations more susceptible than others to environmental catastrophes? To what extent can scientific, technological, and engineering advances along with popular thought mediate urban disasters?   This colloquium is an invited speaker series, facilitated and supplemented by the instructor that will explore these issues.  Guest presenters will address these questions from historical, sociological, cultural, political/policy, economic, and other perspectives; in this way, students will be introduced to a variety of academic disciplinary approaches to environmental and urban studies.

Friday, November 4, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Using C. elegans to Investigate How Animals Survive in Low Oxygen Conditions

Heather L. Bennett
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Thursday, November 3, 2016

How do we know what they know? Assessing students' conceptual understanding

speaker Dr. Janet BranchawUniversity of
Wisconsin-Madison
Cary Institute auditorium. 2801 Sharon Turnpike (Route 44), Millbrook, NY  hosted by Dr. Alan Berkowitz

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Saw Kill Watershed Community

Community Meeting about local water science, recreation, education, and stewardship!
Red Hook Town Hall  The Saw Kill Watershed Community (SKWC) protects the Saw Kill watershed and its ecological, recreational, and historic resources through hands-on science, education, and advocacy.

Who we are:
The Saw Kill Watershed Community was formed to unite folks who reside and work in Milan, Red Hook, Rhinebeck, and Annandale-on-Hudson who are interested in the protection and management of the Saw Kill and its watershed. Our group is made up of farmers, scientists, students, educators, sportsmen, historians, conservationists, municipal leaders, and many others (see our SKWC People page!). We have monthly meetings not only to discuss our progress but also to get input from members from the community on where help is needed and what we can do. Please join us in this community effort!

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

EUS Colloquium: Jared Day – “The Berkeley Pit: An Impending Disaster”


Olin Language Center 120  What are urban environmental disasters?  How natural are they, and to what extent are they caused by human ideations and actions? Why are certain populations more susceptible than others to environmental catastrophes? To what extent can scientific, technological, and engineering advances along with popular thought mediate urban disasters?   This colloquium is an invited speaker series, facilitated and supplemented by the instructor that will explore these issues.  Guest presenters will address these questions from historical, sociological, cultural, political/policy, economic, and other perspectives; in this way, students will be introduced to a variety of academic disciplinary approaches to environmental and urban studies.

Sunday, October 30, 2016

The Ecology of Lyme Disease Outdoor Program
 


Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, 2801 Sharon Turnpike 12545  Join Cary Institute disease ecologist Dr. Rick Ostfeld for an outdoor program exploring the ecology of Lyme disease.

Saturday, October 29, 2016

Tree-planting with “Trees for Tribs” and Scenic Hudson


Rose Hill Farm in Red Hook  Tree plantings are important for providing buffer zones that help protect the quality of the river. Come for a great opportunity to get outside and make a difference you can see!

Saturday, October 29, 2016

"Ecological Spirituality and Laudato Si'"


Burke Lounge in Spellman Hall, Iona College  The Thomas Berry Forum for Ecological Dialogue at Iona College is pleased to announce a conference on the theme of "Ecological Spirituality and Laudato Si'"

"The gravity of the ecological crisis demands that we all look to the common good, embarking on a path of dialogue which demands patience, self-discipline and generosity."  Pope Francis

In his encyclical, Laudato Si: On Care for Our Common Home, Pope Francis advocates an “ecological spirituality,” to “motivate a more passionate concern for the protection of our world” (216). The Pope echoes Thomas  Berry's challenge to all religions to recover their Earth-centered spiritualities, in order to activate a new and shared ecological sensibility and responsibility.  

We welcome proposals for papers, presentations, panels and ritual from new voices. Submissions are open to emerging scholars at both the graduate and undergraduate level, as well as ecological activists, artists and contemplatives. 

Presentations can draw connections between a variety of Ecological Spiritualities and Laudato Si:
The “Great Work” of Thomas Berry or any features of his challenging legacy
Ecological Spiritualities of Indigenous Religions, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism...
The broader tradition of Christian Spirituality, Contemplation and Social Justice
Multi-faith/Inter-faith Common Ground for Eco-spiritualities
Sacred Arts and Ecological Spirituality
Ecological Embodiment: Life-practice, Integral Ecology, Witness...
 
Proposals should include a title or theme, an abstract of approximately 200 words and a brief bio of the author/presenters.
  
Please submit proposals to The Thomas Berry Forum for Ecological Dialogue to kdeignan@iona.edu by September 29, 2016. 

Conference fee paid at the door for presenters: $15 to cover luncheon and refreshments.

Friday, October 28, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Retrofitting the American Dream: An Ethnography of Suburban Redesign

Rachel Heiman,
The New School
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 
 There has been much speculation about the future of the suburban American dream as volatile economic conditions, energy concerns, and climate change make the low-density landscape of single-family homes increasingly unviable. There has been a growing literature on architecture, planning, and policy efforts to reimagine automobile suburbs for a more sustainable future, yet here has been little ethnographic research that explores the transformation of sedimented ideals and ways of being as people’s everyday routines and familiar spaces shift amid efforts to retrofit the material and social landscape of suburbia. Drawing on fieldwork in South Jordan, Utah—one of the fastest growing suburbs in the United States due to the ongoing construction of Daybreak, a massive, master-planned, environmentally friendly, mixed-use transit-oriented community built on reclaimed land once used for mining activities—this talk asks: is a nascent “new normal” emerging out of the environmental limitations, “cruel optimism,” and segregationist design of the postwar American dream? Given that Daybreak was designed and first developed by a land development subsidiary of one of the largest mining companies in the world, this talk sheds light on the formation of new subjectivies and new regimes of governance at the intersection of sustainable urbanism, corporate social responsibility (CSR), and social justice concerns.

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Gender and Migration in France
and the United States

Nancy L. Green
 
Reem-Kayden Center Room 102 
 
Over the last four decades, research has moved from the “discovery” of the history of immigration – initially seen largely as a story of male workers – to a “discovery” of female migrants.  Closer attention to the gender composition of migration streams has become an increasingly important aspects of migration studies. Using the United States and France, two major historical sites of labor immigration, as examples, I will show how gender studies bring new questions – and answers – to the understanding of the history of migration.  How have gender regimes in the countries of origin affected emigration and how has immigration affected gender relations?

Nancy Green is professor of history at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris.   She is the author of several books in French and English including Ready-to-Wear and Ready-to-Work: A Century of Industry and Immigrants in Paris and New York and The Other Americans in Paris : Businessmen, Countesses, Wayward Youth1880-1941.    She recently also co-edited (with sociologist Roger Waldinger) the collection of essays, A century of Transnationalism: Immigrants and Their Homeland Connections.
 

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Remodeling Under Pressure: Bone Cell Differentiation in Response to Mechanical Stimulation

Ayse Aydemir
Bard High School Early College, Manhattan
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Thursday, October 27, 2016

The ‘parasite paradox’: using community ecology to understand the diversity-disease relationships

speaker Dr. Pieter Johnson - University of Colorado
Cary Institute auditorium. 2801 Sharon Turnpike (Route 44), Millbrook, NY  hosted by Dr. Richard Ostfeld

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Owl Walk


Meet at the entrance to the Tivoli Bays Wildlife Management area, just past Cruger Village on Cruger Island Road 

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

EUS Colloquium: Ginny Hanusik – “Rebuilding: New Approaches to the New Orleans Landscape, Post-Katrina”


Olin Language Center 120  What are urban environmental disasters?  How natural are they, and to what extent are they caused by human ideations and actions? Why are certain populations more susceptible than others to environmental catastrophes? To what extent can scientific, technological, and engineering advances along with popular thought mediate urban disasters?   This colloquium is an invited speaker series, facilitated and supplemented by the instructor that will explore these issues.  Guest presenters will address these questions from historical, sociological, cultural, political/policy, economic, and other perspectives; in this way, students will be introduced to a variety of academic disciplinary approaches to environmental and urban studies.

Saturday, October 22, 2016

Applesauce Workshop


Montgomery Place Orchards   Learn how to make (and take home!!) your own applesauce! Sponsored by CCE, EUS and BardEATS with Montgomery Place. Take advantage of our delicious local apples and have fun with friends in the process.

Friday, October 21, 2016

Emerging Infectious Diseases & Amphibian Biodiversity
 


Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, 2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY 12545  Dr. Karen Lips will describe the impact chytrid pathogens have had on frogs and salamanders globally, and what we might expect as new pathogens emerge and spread.

Friday, October 21, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Thursday, October 20, 2016

"In Poor Taste: Thoughts on Sugar, Labor, and the Special Commodity"
 

Anjuli Raza Kolb, Williams College
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 
This talk posits zombi as an immanent theory of labor, consumption, and the material itinerary of what we call taste. Beginning with an account of Marx’s special commodity, Professor Raza Kolb will explore how production and consumption crystallize into a set of signs pointing beyond allegories of monstrosity, and beyond a West Indian aesthetics bounded by capital in the age of empire and today.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Mining Processes in Biological Networks

Petko Bogdanov
University at Albany - SUNY
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Day in the Life of the Hudson River

Learn about the life in the South Bay!
Bard Field Station  Bard students and Red Hook community members will be teaching Red Hook students about the Hudson River, using our very own Tivoli South Bay as the classroom.

We will catch fish, explore the muck, measure oxygen, and spy on ships! There may be some song and dance in there as well!

Let Tom know if you are interested in participating as a teacher or student! Either way it should be a splash!

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Water Quality Monitoring of the Saw Kill


Part of our ongoing monthly citizen science project. Community members volunteer to collect samples from the Saw Kill that are processed at Bard College’s water lab. Help us with our research to better understand the Saw Kill!
 

Friday, October 14, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Film Screening: Are You Listening!

Director Kamar Ahmad Simon. Bangladesh, 2012, 90 minutes.
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  An award-winning documentary film revealing the effects of climate change on the coastal village of Sutarkhali, Bangladesh in the wake of a cyclone induced tidal surge. The film's world premier was as the 'Curtain Opener' for the 55th DOK festival in Leipzig Germany in 2012. Screening is for ANTH/EUS 223 Conservation Anthropology.

Monday, October 10, 2016

Watersheds, airsheds, and the bacteria in between

Scientific seminar by EUS/Biology professor Eli Dueker
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, 2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY 12545 

Friday, October 7, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Thursday, October 6, 2016

Virus Adaptation (Or Not) to Environmental Change

Paul Turner, Yale University
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Thursday, October 6, 2016

From planetary boundaries to ecosystem services: guiding development on a changing planet

speaker Dr. Elena BennettMcGill University
Cary Institute auditorium. 2801 Sharon Turnpike (Route 44), Millbrook, NY  hosted by Dr. Christopher Solomon

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Saw Kill Watershed Community

Community Meeting about local water science, recreation, education, and stewardship!
Red Hook Town Hall  The Saw Kill Watershed Community (SKWC) protects the Saw Kill watershed and its ecological, recreational, and historic resources through hands-on science, education, and advocacy.

Who we are:
The Saw Kill Watershed Community was formed to unite folks who reside and work in Milan, Red Hook, Rhinebeck, and Annandale-on-Hudson who are interested in the protection and management of the Saw Kill and its watershed. Our group is made up of farmers, scientists, students, educators, sportsmen, historians, conservationists, municipal leaders, and many others (see our SKWC People page!). We have monthly meetings not only to discuss our progress but also to get input from members from the community on where help is needed and what we can do. Please join us in this community effort!

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

EUS Colloquium: Alice Stroup – “The Black Death and Medieval Cities”


Olin Language Center, Room 115  What are urban environmental disasters?  How natural are they, and to what extent are they caused by human ideations and actions? Why are certain populations more susceptible than others to environmental catastrophes? To what extent can scientific, technological, and engineering advances along with popular thought mediate urban disasters?   This colloquium is an invited speaker series, facilitated and supplemented by the instructor that will explore these issues.  Guest presenters will address these questions from historical, sociological, cultural, political/policy, economic, and other perspectives; in this way, students will be introduced to a variety of academic disciplinary approaches to environmental and urban studies.

Friday, September 30, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Bard Summer Research Institute Poster Session


Reem-Kayden Center 

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Two Diverging Roads Differing in Risk and Reward

Jozsef Meszaros
Columbia University
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Friday, September 23, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Friday, September 23, 2016

Saw Kill "Stream Walk"

Join us as we explore our "stream"
Community Garden Parking Lot  Please join the Saw Kill Watershed Community next Friday, September 23rd, from Noon to 4PM for a Stream Walk! It should be a great time getting to know the first mile of our precious Saw Kill (the Bard section), and a fun time for all of us, for sure.

Directions: 
Please meet us at the "Community Garden parking lot" near the intersection of Blithewood Road and Bay Road on Bard's campus. We'll walk to the start of the official stream walk (near Bard Field station--no good parking down there). 

Overview of the Activity: 
A “Stream Walk” is a scientific field assessment method that involves professional and citizen scientists assessing the health of a section of a stream based on visual criteria. This is done by walking along the edge of the stream or wading right down the middle. We'll make observations, take measurements, and take notes--it'll be fun! We'll see waterfalls as well as plenty of cool plants and animals! (Just today we found many cool, friendly fish and insects in the water!). We gave ourselves 4 hours but it could be over in 2-3!

What to bring: 
A small backpack
A big water bottle
A snack (or 2)
A pencil/pen
Clothes/products for sun/bugs
Rubber boots (or wear our waders)
Socks for boots/waders
Camera (optional)
Binoculars (optional)
Tape measure (optional)

Looking forward to walking and exploring the Saw Kill together!

The Saw Kill Watershed Community

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Why We Turned a Lake Brown and What We Learned

Chris Solomon
Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

EUS Colloquium: Tehseen Thaver – “Disasters in the Islamic Thought”


Olin Language Center, Room 115  What are urban environmental disasters?  How natural are they, and to what extent are they caused by human ideations and actions? Why are certain populations more susceptible than others to environmental catastrophes? To what extent can scientific, technological, and engineering advances along with popular thought mediate urban disasters?   This colloquium is an invited speaker series, facilitated and supplemented by the instructor that will explore these issues.  Guest presenters will address these questions from historical, sociological, cultural, political/policy, economic, and other perspectives; in this way, students will be introduced to a variety of academic disciplinary approaches to environmental and urban studies.

Friday, September 16, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

EUS Colloquium: Rabbi David Nelson – “Disasters in the Jewish Tradition”


Olin Language Center, Room 115  What are urban environmental disasters?  How natural are they, and to what extent are they caused by human ideations and actions? Why are certain populations more susceptible than others to environmental catastrophes? To what extent can scientific, technological, and engineering advances along with popular thought mediate urban disasters?   This colloquium is an invited speaker series, facilitated and supplemented by the instructor that will explore these issues.  Guest presenters will address these questions from historical, sociological, cultural, political/policy, economic, and other perspectives; in this way, students will be introduced to a variety of academic disciplinary approaches to environmental and urban studies.

Friday, September 9, 2016

Natural History Walk

Explore the plants, animals, and mysteries of the Bard lands
Campus Center, Lobby  Join EUS naturalist Tom O'Dowd, Arboretum horticulturalist Dan McKenna, and a team of savvy students as we identify plants and animals around Bard. We roam from campus plantings to deep woods; from the Hudson River to the dryest spots on campus; and sometimes we change times/locations radically (e.g. hiking at night or taking pomology lessons at a nearby apple orchard). There are always new "natural mysteries" to be found.

If you're interested in the Tutorial for credits, EUS T150: Natural History, contact Tom O'Dowd!

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Saw Kill Watershed Community

Community Meeting about local water science, recreation, education, and stewardship!
Red Hook Town Hall  The Saw Kill Watershed Community (SKWC) protects the Saw Kill watershed and its ecological, recreational, and historic resources through hands-on science, education, and advocacy.

Who we are:
The Saw Kill Watershed Community was formed to unite folks who reside and work in Milan, Red Hook, Rhinebeck, and Annandale-on-Hudson who are interested in the protection and management of the Saw Kill and its watershed. Our group is made up of farmers, scientists, students, educators, sportsmen, historians, conservationists, municipal leaders, and many others (see our SKWC People page!). We have monthly meetings not only to discuss our progress but also to get input from members from the community on where help is needed and what we can do. Please join us in this community effort!

Friday, August 26, 2016

6th Annual Bard CEP Alumni/ae Panel


Ward Manor  Join us Friday, August 26th from 10am - 12pm in Manor House for a conversation with Bard Center for Environmental Policy alumni/ae on environmental policy careers and life in the professional realm. Members of the CEP community are encouraged to attend.

Alumni/ae Panelists Include:

Ann Starodaj '12
Director of Sustainability at Optoro

Jessica Schug '15
Legislative Coordinator at New York State Assembly

Serena Macintosh '14
Research & Data Coordinator at Transportation Alternatives

Natalie Narotzky '12
Communications and Member Services Coordinator at Urban Sustainability Directors Network

Rochelle March '15
Analyst at SustainAbility 

Chad Tudenggongbu '11
Senior Renewable Energy Campaigner at Center for Biological Diversity
 

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

L&T Sustainability Mixer

Learn what EUS, CCE, BOS, Eco-Reps, and SKWC are all about!
Olin SUSTAINABLE parking lot  Learn about all the sustainability people, projects, and places happening at Bard and beyond!

Environmental and Urban Studies (EUS): the interdisciplinary undergraduate academic program.
Center for Civic Engagement (CCE): the people encouragin all Bardians to engage the broader community.
Bard Office of Sustainability (BOS): the people encouraging sustainable practices at Bard.
Eco-Reps: the student wing of BOS
Saw Kill Watershed Community (SKWC): a project to bring Bardians and community members together to study, protect, and enjoy our local water!
Bard EATS: "Eating Awareness Transforms Society" works to make our food sustainable!
Bard Farm: Growings some of our food on campus!
Bard Center for Environmental Policy (CEP): The graduate academic program in sustainability.

The Olin parking lot is sustainable and has constructed wetland features that are fun to check out.

Friday, June 24, 2016

Lessons from the Forest - Ned Ames Honorary Lecture


Cary Institute, Millbrook  For more than 50 years, the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire has been one of the most intensely studied landscapes on earth. In this special lecture, Gene Likens, Cary Institute President Emeritus, will showcase his new book, Hubbard Brook: The Story of a Forest Ecosystem, co-authored with Richard Holmes of Dartmouth College. Join one of the nation's most respected ecologists for a thoughtful and engaging lecture on why long-term, place-based ecological studies are essential to addressing society's most pressing environmental issues, from air pollution and water quality to climate change. Stories will include the discovery of acid rain, impacts of forest management practices, population change in forest birds, and how disturbance events, such as pests and pathogens and a changing climate affect both our forests and the quality of freshwater. The lecture will be held at Cary Institute auditorium, 2801 Sharon Turnpike (Route 44)
Millbrook.  http://www.caryinstitute.org/events/lessons-forest
 

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Friends or Foes? When Plant Pathogens Make Rain

Cindy Morris, Montana State University
Campus Center, Weis Cinema 
Plant pathogens can cause diseases of considerable importance to food crops, forests, ornamentals, etc. But many of the microorganisms that can cause plant disease also are saprophytes and have aspects of their life history of which little is known. Growing interest in environmental microbiology has helped to uncover surprising aspects of life history of plant pathogens leading to new perspectives on the beneficial role that they might be playing for the environment. One example is Pseudomonas syringae as a plant-associated bacterium first described over 50 years ago. Our vision of its ecology has moved away from ubiquitous epiphytic plant pathogen to multifaceted bacterium sans frontières in fresh water and other ecosystems linked to the water cycle. Discovery of the aquatic facet of its ecology has led to a vision of its life history that integrates spatial and temporal scales spanning billions of years and traversing catchment basins, continents and the planet, and that confronts the implication of roles that are potentially conflicting for agriculture and society at large – as a plant pathogen and as a beneficial actor in processes leading to rain and snowfall. This new ecological perspective has also yielded insight into epidemiological phenomena linked to disease emergence.  It sets the stage for the integration of more comprehensive contexts of ecology and evolutionary history into comparative genomic analyses to elucidate how P. syringae subverts attack and defense responses of the cohabitants of the diverse environments it occupies. I will present the vision of the evolving story of the ecology and biology of P. syringae and the conflicting challenges and opportunities for management of plant health and ecosystem services that ensue for this and other plant pathogens.

 

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Woodlands, Wetlands, and Water: What Local Decision-Makers Need to Know


Bethlehem Town Hall auditorium, 445 Delaware Ave, Delmar  Learn about the forests and wetlands in the Capital Region, the ways forests and wetlands influence water quality, drinking water, flood attenuation, and other vital benefits, and how local government can play a role in sustaining these resources. This event is open to the public, and will offer practical guidance and tools for members of municipal boards and others involved in land-use decisions and conservation. Self-certification forms for 3 hours of municipal training credit will be available for members of local boards.The training is co-sponsored by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia & Greene Counties, Albany County Department of Economic Development, Conservation, and Planning, Schenectady County Department of Economic Development and Planning, Mohawk Hudson Land Conservancy, and the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation’s Hudson River Estuary Program with support from the NYS Environmental Protection Fund. Light refreshments will be served. Register online at https://reg.cce.cornell.edu/wetlands_210 or by phone at 518-622-9820 x0.
 
 

Friday, May 20, 2016

EUS and CEP students GIS presentation


Campus Center, Lobby  The class will be introducing and displaying their Geographic Information System (GIS) posters this Friday. Students spent their spring semester exploring the various spatial analysis methods used by scientists, planners, and public-policy makers to improve the understanding and management of our world. They learned the fundamentals of modeling, data analysis, mapping, and conducting an environmental-impact assessment using geospatial technologies. Students used these skills for various research projects that are showcased in the upcoming poster session.

Friday, May 20, 2016

Bike to Work Day


Your Home   Friday May 20 is Bike to Work Day!!!
Join the V. Red Hook ride to Bard at Taste Budd's 8:15am for a leisurely ride to campus (depart 8:30am)
Tivoli riders - make a meet up at Murrays and ride your mountain bike through Tivoli Bays.
Kingston riders - make a meet up at the park n ride on the Kingston side of the bridge.

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

iMap Invasives 2016 Training Sessions


Millbrook, NY (various other locations)  New York iMapInvasives will be holding spring training sessions throughout the state in May and June. Each session will be coordinated through the Partnerships for Regional Invasive Species Management (PRISM), and will include training for basic and advanced data entry. There will also be species identification modules offered this year as well, with more details to come. Anyone interested in mapping invasive species locations and management efforts is welcome to attend these free sessions. Contact imapinvasives@nynhp.org with any questions and visit http://www.nyimapinvasives.org/Training/2016-training-shcedule to see where and when the trainings will be held.

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Upper Route 9G CMP Public Workshop (Tivoli Village Hall)


Tivoli Village Hall 
The Poughkeepsie-Dutchess County Transportation Council (PDCTC) is pleased to announce that it has scheduled two public workshops on Wed., May 11th and Thur., May 12th to gather feedback on draft recommendations for the Upper Route 9G Corridor Management Plan. The recommendations aim to improve transportation safety and access on NYS Route 9G in the Red Hook/Tivoli area, CR 78 (Broadway) through Tivoli, and CR 103 (Annandale Rd) through Bard College. The two workshops will have the same format and material and will be held at different locations and times to accommodate residents’ schedules:
More information about the PDCTC and the study is available at http://www.dutchessny.gov/pdctc.htm and http://www.upperroute9g.com/.

Thursday, May 12, 2016

NYS Climate Change Science Clearinghouse - An Online Resource for Practical Information on our Changing Climate (Webinar)


Webinar  Despite a wealth of information, understanding climate change and what to do about it can be challenging. Local planners can find it difficult or time consuming to identify the vulnerabilities in their communities and evaluate appropriate strategies for how to respond. The New York Climate Change Science Clearinghouse (NYCCSC) is a new online resource that helps identify and access relevant documents, data, websites, tools, and maps to address climate change adaptation and mitigation. During this Climate Smart Communities webinar, a speaker from the developer of the site, Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM), will provide an overview of the NYCCSC and demonstrate its interactive map, data tool, and curated, searchable resource bank. For instructions on joining the webinar, visit https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/NYSDEC/bulletins/14558cf. All Climate Smart Community webinars are recorded and available for later viewing at http://www.dec.ny.gov/energy/84359.html.

Thursday, May 12, 2016

NYSDEC Public Meetings on Deer Management

Participate Online or In-Person for an Update on New York’s Deer Program and to
Provide Input
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will host a webinar “New York Deer Management Update” the evenings of May 10 and May 12.  Both nights will have the same content.  Any member of the public can participate on either night by connecting online from the comfort of their own home or by joining DEC staff at locations throughout the state. The webinar is designed to inform New York deer hunters and the general public about current issues in deer management and to set the stage for updating DEC’s Management Plan for White-tailed Deer in New York State.  DEC will provide an overview of the state’s deer management program, outline progress on current deer program activities including a brief explanation of DEC’s recent decision to encourage hunters to voluntarily pass up young bucks, and discuss current management priorities including urban-suburban deer over abundance, reducing deer impacts on forests, and other issues. The presentation will be simulcast online and to a number of meeting venues where participants will have opportunity to meet their regional DEC deer biologist. After the presentation, DEC staff will be available online and in-person to answer questions and discuss public concerns about deer management. For instructions about how to connect online, for the list of locations where the meetings will be hosted by DEC staff, and for updates on this process, seehttp://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/57795.html.
 

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Waste Cluster Event

Artist talk with Margaret Cogswell and student presentations
Fisher Studio Arts Building 
Environmental and Urban Studies is hosting an Artist Talk and Final Student Presentations from the Waste Cluster, three classes focusing on wastewater throughout the semester in Environmental and Urban Studies, Studio Arts, and Anthropology, with support from the Center for Civic Engagement.
Guest Artist Margaret Cogswell will present her ongoing River Fugues projects which focus on water rights, water quality, and sustainability issues along the Cuyahoga River in Ohio, the New River in Virginia, rivers and groundwater in Wyoming, and the New York City aquaduct system in relation to the Catskills Watershed.
Waste Cluster student final projects will be presented after the talk with critique by Margaret Cogswell for Studio Arts projects, presentations by the Politics of Infrastructure class in Anthropology, and poster presentations by the Environmental and Urban Studies class.

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Upper Route 9G CMP Public Workshop (Bard)


Campus Center, Lobby 
The Poughkeepsie-Dutchess County Transportation Council (PDCTC) is pleased to announce that it has scheduled two public workshops on Wed., May 11th and Thur., May 12th to gather feedback on draft recommendations for the Upper Route 9G Corridor Management Plan. The recommendations aim to improve transportation safety and access on NYS Route 9G in the Red Hook/Tivoli area, CR 78 (Broadway) through Tivoli, and CR 103 (Annandale Rd) through Bard College. The two workshops will have the same format and material and will be held at different locations and times to accommodate residents’ schedules:
More information about the PDCTC and the study is available at http://www.dutchessny.gov/pdctc.htm and http://www.upperroute9g.com/

Sunday, May 8, 2016

Volunteer with the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater


Kingston, NY  Put the Bilge Weights back onboard! May 7 & 8 from 9:00-3:00
In October 2015 we asked for help moving bilge weights from off of the sloop so we could start working on her hull. Now, we need your help putting them all back on! No need to register, please just show up with work gloves. We'll provide coffee, water and a light snack.

Saturday, May 7, 2016

Saw Kill Tree Planting


Red Hook Recreation Park  On Saturday May 7, the Saw Kill Watershed Community will be hosting a community tree planting at Red Hook Recreation Park with help from Trees-for-Tribs. We are inviting all those who would like to participate in the tree-planting and help protect our watershed! The trees will act as a stabilizer to prevent erosion into the Saw Kill. We will begin planting at 1:30 pm and will be finished by 3:30 pm at the latest! Trees, tools, beverages, and snacks will be provided. Bring boots, sturdy pants, work gloves, and sunscreen if possible!

To RSVP or if you have any further questions please contact Olivia Williams at ow1310@bard.edu

Saturday, May 7, 2016

Cleanup of South Tivoli Bay in Canoes


Field Station 
On May 7th from 1-3 PM, Bard student Jessica Chappe (jc7846@bard.edu) will lead a cleanup of South Tivoli Bay in canoes!
This is in coordination with the Riverkeeper Clean Sweep. 
Contact Jessica for more information and a spot in a boat!

Saturday, May 7, 2016

Apple Blossom Day


Red Hook Village 

When: Saturday, May 7, 2016, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Where: Red Hook Village 

Who: Children, youth, adults, and seniors will certainly find something fun!

What: Live music, children’s games, unique vendors, delicious local food, and *new this year* the Red Hook Film Festival


Saturday, May 7, 2016

Science & Management Forum: The Future of Oak Forests


Cary Institute, Millbrook  Did you know that oak forests are in decline throughout the Northeast? Many of our forestlands lack the young oaks needed for successful regeneration. When mature oaks are lost through harvest, age, or disturbance they are often replaced by other types of trees. Interested in the future of oak forests? On Saturday, May 7, the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies will be hosting a special forum on the topic. Event co-sponsors include the Dutchess Land Conservancy, Great Mountain Forest, New York Forest Owners Association, and Oblong Land Conservancy. Discover how absence of fire, deer proliferation, shade-tolerant maples, logging practices, and climate change threaten oak regeneration. Explore the importance of oaks to wildlife and how land use practices set the stage for oak declines. Through an interactive panel, gain firsthand knowledge about how private forest owners and land managers can make a difference.
The event will take place at the Cary Institute Auditorium located at 2801 Sharon Tpk. (Rt. 44) in Millbrook, NY.  It is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Register online at www.caryinstitute.org/oak-forum or call (845) 677-7600 x121.
Light refreshments will be provided. Attending this forum may qualify towards three hours of New York State required municipal training credits. If you have questions, contact Lori Quillen at quillenl@caryinstitute.org.
 

Friday, May 6, 2016

Natural History Walks with Tom O'Dowd and Bard Arboretum Staff


Location Varies  Join Tom's tutorial group every Friday for walks focused on learning natural history and plant identification!

Friday, May 6, 2016 – Saturday, May 7, 2016

Red Hook Film Festival


Red Hook  "We believe in the power of short, independently produced films to inspire, entertain and affect the viewer's mind through great storytelling - which is why we started the Red Hook Film Festival, now in its third year.  Red Hook is a small community that opens its arms to invite filmmakers to join with them to watch a few evenings of great films.  It is an experience we enjoy and take pleasure in doing together.

The festival is produced for you, the filmmaker, as much as it is for the local community and we encourage filmmakers within a one hundred mile radius to submit to the 2016 festival event May 6-7th.  The deadline for submissions is April 1, 2016. We limit submissions to the one hundred mile area to not only acknowledge the large number of filmmakers working in the Hudson Valley and surrounding area but also to insure that the directors of all films in the festival have an opportunity to be here for the screening of their films."

If interested submit at http://www.redhookfilmfestival.com/submit.html 

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Film Screening: Sushi- The Global Catch

Presented by Zero Waste Club
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  From humble beginnings as a simple food sold by Japanese street vendors, sushi has exploded into an international phenomenon in the past 30 years. SUSHI: THE GLOBAL CATCH is a feature-length documentary shot in five countries exploring the history, problems and future of this popular cuisine. Much of sushi's rich cultural tradition that began in Tokyo is changing as raw fish now appear from cities like Warsaw and New York to small towns worldwide. But what is the cost? Will the worldwide hunger for sushi continue to grow until wild fish vanish, or will new technology like aquaculture keep plates full? Can sustainable sushi restaurants satisfy consumers or will competition for declining resources drive prices so high that only a few can afford raw fish? 
     

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

2016 Hudson River Symposium

The Hudson River Estuary and Mohawk River: "The Coming Together of the Waters" 
Student Union Building, State University of New York at New Paltz  This one day symposium seeks to reconnect the resource professionals, educators, students, and interested public of the Hudson River Estuary and the Mohawk River by highlighting the environmental and cultural influence the Mohawk River has on the Estuary. Presentations will cover a wide range of topics including the geologic history of the Mohawk River, the Mohawk River Valley as a source of nutrients and sediments to the Estuary, the history of and current role of the Erie Canal system, the threat from invasive species, the state of fisheries science, and the role of hydropower in managing flow and providing fish passage. A poster session and reception will wind up the day, providing ample opportunity for participants from the Mohawk River and Hudson Valley to connect and plan for the
future.
 

Monday, May 2, 2016

Saw Kill Watershed Community Meeting


Red Hook Village Hall  Saw Kill Watershed Community's monthly meeting. They meet the first Monday of every month to discuss important watershed issues and community engagement. Get involved!

Friday, April 29, 2016

Natural History Walks with Tom O'Dowd and Bard Arboretum Staff


Location Varies  Join Tom's tutorial group every Friday for walks focused on learning natural history and plant identification!

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Weaponized Architecture from Palestine
to the Paris Suburbs

Leopold Lambert, editor of The Funambulist magazine and author of the books Topie Impitoyable and Bulldozer Politcs.
Campus Center, Weis Cinema 
Architecture is a political weapon. Its elemental form, the wall, organizes (sometimes violently) bodies in space both at the domestic and geographical levels. This lecture will introduce instances of such violence through the two examples of Palestine and the French banlieues (suburbs). The case of Palestine will be presented in terms of the role of architecture in the current situation and with reference to a post-apartheid vision for the future. The French banlieues are the dwelling places of a post-colonial population who must cope with both segregative urbanism and an antagonistic relationship with the police, which has been exacerbated during the present state of emergency in France. In both cases, a political and architectural interpretation of the situation will be presented through cartography and photography.

Free & open to the public

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

EUS Film: "The Power of Community - How Cuba Survived Peak Oil"

with Mark Lytle, History and EUS Professor Emeritus
Olin 102  Retired EUS and History professor Mark Lytle recently returned from a trip to Cuba and would like to share this film with us. There will be a brief discussion after the event.

The documentary, "The Power of Community - How Cuba Survived Peak Oil," was inspired when Faith Morgan and Pat Murphy took a trip to Cuba through Global Exchange in August, 2003.

The goals of this film are to give hope to the developed world as it wakes up to the consequences of being hooked on oil, and to lift American's prejudice of Cuba by showing the Cuban people as they are. The filmmakers do this by having the people tell their story on film. It's a story of their dedication to independence and triumph over adversity, and a story of cooperation and hope. Several Cubans expressed the belief that living on an island, with its natural boundaries, breeds awareness that there are limits to natural resources. Everyone who has worked on the documentary hopes that, seeing this film, people will also see the world on which we live, as another, much larger, island.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability:
Open House in New York City

Attendees receive $65 application fee waiver!
New York City  Join us in New York City for an Open House hosted by the Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability. Admissions staff, faculty, and current students will be on hand to provide an overview of the programs offered, answer questions, and share tips on how to make your application stand out. 

REGISTER HERE

This event will be held in our New York City classroom located at ImpactHub NYC, 394 Broadway, New York, NY 10013

Email Caitlin O'Donnell with any questions.



Monday, April 25, 2016

EUS Open House


Hegeman 102  Come meet EUS faculty, staff, and students!

Learn about Fall courses, recent internships, and current Senior Projects!

There will be dinner food, posters showing some current EUS work, and Q+A about all things EUS.

Looking forward to seeing you!

Friday, April 22, 2016

Earth Day Event: Showing of ‘The Messenger’


Jim Ottaway Jr. Film Center  Ornithologists Bruce Robertson (Bard College) and Kara Belinksy (SUNY New Paltz) will introduce this incredible new feature film documentary about the perils birds face in an increasingly human-dominated world, let you view museum specimens of migratory birds close up, and introduce you to bird-friendly coffee!  
 
The Movie: Su Rynard’s documentary THE MESSENGER explores our deep-seated connection to birds and warns that the uncertain fate of songbirds might mirror our own. The movie features the first ever close-up photography of migrating songbirds in flight. Moving from the northern reaches of the Boreal Forest to the base of Mount Ararat in Turkey to the streets of New York, THE MESSENGER brings us face-to-face with a remarkable variety of human-made perils that have devastated thrushes, warblers, orioles, tanagers, grosbeaks and many other airborne music-makers.

Reception with food begins at 6:15 p.m.  The movie starts at 7:00 p.m.

Friday, April 22, 2016

Natural History Walks with Tom O'Dowd and Bard Arboretum Staff


Location Varies  Join Tom's tutorial group every Friday for walks focused on learning natural history and plant identification!

Monday, April 18, 2016

Religion, witchcraft, magic and kinship in former colonies of Great Britain and Portugal

Peter Fry



Olin, Room 201 
Peter is a scholar, social commentator and public intellectual with an unusual range of research experience. Born in England and educated at Cambridge University, his career has taken him to Southern Africa and to Brazil, where he has lived and taught for forty years. He is one of Brazil’s most distinguished anthropologists, a former Vice-President of the Brazilian Association of Anthropologists, and editor of the leading anthropological journal Vibrant.

Friday, April 15, 2016

Conversation with Dal LaMagna


Kline, Faculty Dining Room  Dal LaMagna, CEO of IceStone and founder and CEO of Tweezerman, will be talking about his career as a serial failed entrepreneur, who finally got it right. From a leadership perspective, a great talk for environmental policy and econ folks, and in fact, Dal also has a policy degree from the Kennedy School of government, and has run for Congress. Dal is very funny and wise, so it will be an hour well spent. Please join us at 7 PM this Friday in the Faculty Dining Room in Kline. 

<http://www.dallamagna.com/>
IceStone : <https://icestoneusa.com/products/icestone/>

Friday, April 15, 2016

Natural History Walks with Tom O'Dowd and Bard Arboretum Staff


Location Varies  Join Tom's tutorial group every Friday for walks focused on learning natural history and plant identification!

Friday, April 15, 2016

11th Annual Student Summit of the Environmental Consortium of Colleges & Universities

Our Collective Campus: Acting on our Social and Environmental Responsibility
Pace University  Students from around the region, of all disciplines, are called to gather at this year’s Student Summit, where we will ask what it takes to be an advocate, why environmental solutions must involve other disciplines, and how academic institutions can form more meaningful community partnerships.
 
  • FREE and open to all higher education students. All majors are welcome.
  • Keynote, workshops, and think tank.
  • Network with like-minded students.
  • Lunch included!
 
Stay informed, join our student email list: http://environmentalconsortium.org/programs/student/network.html.
 
Connect to our student Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1525705537727861/
 

Friday, April 15, 2016

Natural Resources and Security in East Asia

Jackson Ewing, Asia Society Policy Institute
Campus Center, Weis Cinema 

Thursday, April 14, 2016

Fengshui Forest Management in Rural China

Chris Coggins, Simons Rock
Feitler House 

Thursday, April 14, 2016 – Friday, April 15, 2016

Second Annual Student Research Conference on Asia and the Environment


Bard College Campus  Today it is impossible to think seriously about the challenges of sustainable development and the environment without understanding the local and global environmental footprint of rapid economic growth in Asia—and the Asian response. At the same time, Asian Studies students increasingly require familiarity with the scientific, cultural, and political dimensions of environmental crises and sustainable development.

With the support of the Henry Luce Foundation, Bard College is sponsoring this second annual student research conference, providing a venue for students to present undergraduate, masters, and PhD level research at the intersection of these critical issues. The conference seeks to shed critical light on how we all might live sustainably—or not—in a 2050 world with three billion more people, limited resources, a thickening blanket of carbon dioxide heating the planet, and a global economic development process increasingly defined by Asian models and leadership.

The conference will be held on the campus of Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, in the scenic Hudson Valley, which is easily accessible by train from New York City. There is no charge for Bard students. 

Sign up for the mailing list here.

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Environmental Racism


Reem-Kayden Center  A continued conversation featuring EUS faculty members from different disciplines such as biology, sociology, and history. Each will be tackling issues surrounding environmental injustice. and environmental racism through their own academic lenses. This conversation is a faculty response to answer questions brought up by the earlier student led panel and pose their own questions to the community. We hope to address a topic that is often underrepresented in the classroom, and bring it to the Bard community. 
 

Saturday, April 9, 2016

Historic Preservation and Adaptive Reuse at Bard College


Bard College Campus 

Join Hudson River Heritage as we delve into the historic architecture of the Bard College campus.

Known as one of the most beautiful college campuses in the country, Bard’s location in Annandale-on-Hudson, bordering the river and featuring sweeping views of the Catskills, give it a tremendous advantage. Add to that generations of distinguished architecture and beautiful landscape, and it’s easy to appreciate the seductive appeal.
With its recent acquisition of neighboring Montgomery Place, the Bard campus now totals over 1000 acres. In addition to the former estate mansions that survive—Ward Manor, Blithewood, and Montgomery Place, a Gothic Revival gate house, chapel, dormitories, and academic buildings keep company with a Neoclassical library, faculty cottages in various styles, and more recent buildings designed by an impressive roster of prominent 20th century architects.
Our focus will be on the historic preservation and adaptive reuse of the 19th century buildings—the challenges and successes, as well as Bard’s plans for the future, including its goals for the use of the Montgomery Place site. Our keynote speaker will be Bard President Leon Botstein, whom we will recognize with an award for Bard’s leadership and vision with respect to its historic structures. We plan to offer tours of Blithewood throughout the day, and Montgomery Place in the afternoon.
Our daylong program starts with registration and coffee at 9:15 a.m. at Blithewood on the Bard campus, includes a catered lunch, and will conclude by 5:00 p.m. Scheduled speakers include:Terence Dewsnap, Emily Majer, Matt Alexander, Ward Stanley, Peter A. Watson, Jr., and Jim Brudvig.
Cost for the event is $50 for Hudson River Heritage members, $60 for non-members, and $25 for Bard undergraduate students with I.D. Please make your reservations below or via email at: office@hudsonriverheritage.org, or via mail to P.O. Box 287, Rhinebeck, NY 12572.

 


Saturday, April 9, 2016

Sunlight Revolution Action Summit


SUNY New Paltz  On Saturday, April 9th, students from across New York State will converge at SUNY New Paltz to learn how they can take part in catalyzing a statewide transition to renewable energy.  Following the ban of fracking in New York, we have a tremendous opportunity to lead the nation in building a renewable energy economy. This will reduce our reliance on fossil fuels, battle climate change, and create tens of thousands of jobs in the process.  

The Sunlight Revolution Action Summit will bring together student leaders to begin building an organized statewide campaign to advance renewable energy and efficiency on campus as well as create more job opportunities for students to enter the renewable energy workforce. At the summit, Sunlight Revolution campaign coordinators and volunteers from across the state will share the vision for the initiative. We will also provide leadership training and the materials to launch the Sunlight Revolution campaign on their campuses during Earth Week April 17th - 23rd.

Help create a vehicle to give students a voice for building our renewable energy future in New York!

Summit itinerary includes:
  • Launching of Sunlight Revolution, a campaign created by Frack Action and Mark Ruffalo
  • Guest lectures from young professionals in the field of renewable energy and campus organizing
  • Student leadership trainings including How to Write a Press Release, Petitioning, Public Speaking, Lobbying, Canvassing, & more
  • Sharing of #SunlightRevolution posters, postcards and materials for Earth Day
  • Network with existing college environmental groups, students, and clubs

Lunch, coffee and tea will be provided.  Those traveling to New Paltz from out of the area can register to stay with an overnight host.

For students to RSVP, please go to:  bit.ly/SunRev
 

Friday, April 8, 2016

Natural History Walks with Tom O'Dowd and Bard Arboretum Staff


Location Varies  Join Tom's tutorial group every Friday for walks focused on learning natural history and plant identification!

Thursday, April 7, 2016

Understanding the Migrations of Arctic Char in a Changing Arctic: Integrating Telemetry and Genomics to Inform Fisheries Management

Jean-Sebastien Moore, 
Universite Laval
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Environmental Racism


Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  The first, out of a two part series, community conversation on environmental injustice and environmental racism. A student led panel addresses questions around environmental injustice issues through their own experiences. The conversation hopes to better understand how these issues effect Bard students in their own communities. We will tackle questions such as why is this topic under discussed? Why do cases such as Flint continue to happen? How can we better understand how these issues effect people?  
 

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Making Archaeology Work in the Occupied Palestinian Territories

Professor Brian Boyd is Lecturer in the Discipline of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University
Olin, Room 102  Much discussion on historical memory in Palestine-Israel has focused on the political appropriation of archaeological material in the creation of narratives relating to nationalist interests and colonial settlement. The appropriation of archaeology has been traced by foundational texts such as Whitelam (1996), Abu El-Haj (2001), and Finkelstein & Silberman (2001), which in turn have informed often-polarized debates within and outside the discipline. This work has established the political capital in harnessing archaeological narratives in Palestine-Israel, in particular their role in the construction of claims to land and to history over the course of the 20th century. However, in the post-9/11, post-Bush, post-Second Intifada worlds, archaeology finds itself in a very different political, academic - and physical - landscape. The reality on the ground has changed. What kinds of archaeologies have emerged from the changed historical conditions of the last fifteen years? How does archaeology now inhabit those changed conditions?

This seminar discusses a joint Columbia University-Birzeit University Museum Anthropology project in the West Bank town of Shuqba, in the Wadi en-Natuf. The Wadi en-Natuf is currently undergoing a process of destructive landscape alteration, partly through Israeli settlement and road construction, and partly through the large scale dumping and burning of (possibly toxic) industrial and municipal wastes by Israeli and Palestinian agencies. In the face of all this, the local community and archaeologists (faculty and students) are making archaeology work: landscape survey, oral histories/memory maps, and museum/heritage initiatives.

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

The Power Dialog


Albany, NY  As part of a national initiative sponsored by Bard CEP, students from across NY State are gathering to discuss with top state officials what we are doing to cut global warming pollution and meet the US Paris Climate Commitment. 
Bus leaves for SUNY Albany at 3 pm, returns 10 pm.

Monday, April 4, 2016

Public Debate - Bard vs. Vassar - Climate Change


Campus Center, Multipurpose Room 
The Bard Debate Union and the Vassar Debate Team, together with the Center for Environmental Policy and the Center for Civic Engagement, are excited to bring you a public debate on the topic, "Resolved: the US should move faster than the Paris Agreement to cut global warming pollution." This debate is part of Bard's participation in the PowerDialog (http://www.bard.edu/cep/powerdialog/).

Saturday, April 2, 2016

Celebrating the Saw Kill: 175 Years of Scenic Protection


Montgomery Place 
This day-long event commemorates the1841 scenic preservation agreement between the owners of Montgomery Place and Blithewood, two historic estates now part of the Bard campus. Louise Livingston, the owner of Montgomery Place, and Robert Donaldson, the owner of Blithewood, agreed to purchase industrial mills along the Saw Kill from John Church Cruger and demolish them to preserve the scenic beauty of the Saw Kill. It is perhaps the earliest conservation agreement in the nation

To focus attention on this historic event, there will be an  exhibit, symposium, and walking tours on ecology and archaeology of the Saw Kill, and the landscape and architectural features of Montgomery Place and Blithewood, which are significant for their rare surviving examples of the  work of noted 19th-century Romantic-era landscape designer Andrew Jackson Downing and architect A. J. Davis.

Friday, April 1, 2016

Natural History Walks with Tom O'Dowd and Bard Arboretum Staff


Location Varies  Join Tom's tutorial group every Friday for walks focused on learning natural history and plant identification!

Friday, April 1, 2016

How Will Rainfall Change with Global Warming?

Nadir Jeevanjee, University of California-Berkeley
Hegeman 107 
Computer simulations show that global average rainfall increases with surface warming at a rate of roughly 1-3% per Kelvin, but we lack the understanding to estimate this number without resorting to complicated numerical models. This talk will review the basic physics governing mean precipitation, as well as present a new theoretical framework which allows us to intuitively understand as well as quickly estimate this quantity.

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Climate Stabilization Wedge Game

Strategize the best route forward with wedge-shaped pizza, brownies, and solutions!
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  The Stabilization Wedges Game is a team-based exercise that teaches players about the scale of the greenhouse gas problem, plus technologies that already exist to dramatically reduce our carbon emissions and get us off the path toward dramatic and damaging climate change. Groups "compete" by picking carbon-cutting strategies to construct a carbon mitigation portfolio and defending their decisions. Each team will include undergrads, a Bard CEP grad student, staff members, and faculty. This has been a fun event at Bard in the past (video evidence here).

This will be a great lead-in to the Power Dialog on April 5th! Plus it will be fun, interactive, and tasty (pizza "wedges" and wedge-shaped brownies!!).

Friday, March 25, 2016

Natural History Walks with Tom O'Dowd and Bard Arboretum Staff


Location Varies  Join Tom's tutorial group every Friday for walks focused on learning natural history and plant identification!

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Hudson River Valley Greenway Joint Board Meeting


Henry A Wallace Center at the FDR Library, 4097 Albany Post Road|Hyde Park, NY 
The Boards of the Hudson River Valley Greenway Communities Council and Greenway Conservancy for the Hudson River Valley will hold a joint Board Meeting on March 23, 2016, at the 
 
The meeting will feature Greenway business and grant awards for the Hudson River Valley Greenway Grant Program and the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Development Grant Program.
 
The meeting will also feature a presentation by Professor David Schuyler reflecting on the 50th anniversary of saving Olana.
Professor David Schuyler of the Humanities and American Studies at Franklin and Marshall College will trace the steps of a small, but determined group who fought to preserve Olana as a New York State Historic Site. This June marks the 50th anniversary of Olana Preservation's acquisition of the estate-designed landscape, house and collections, and outbuildings, four months before Congress passed the National Historic Preservation Act. Olana Preservation conveyed to the property to New York State in December 1966, and it opened to the public onJune 3, 1967.

Friday, March 18, 2016

Natural History Walks with Tom O'Dowd and Bard Arboretum Staff


Location Varies  Join Tom's tutorial group every Friday for walks focused on learning natural history and plant identification!

Friday, March 18, 2016

Call For Abstracts for 2016 Hudson River Symposium

2016 Hudson River Symposium:
The Hudson River Estuary and Mohawk River:
“The Coming Together of the Waters”
The Hudson River Environmental Society is soliciting abstracts from graduate and undergraduate students,
environmental monitoring groups, resource managers, and scientists for a poster session to be held during its May Hudson River Symposium. This year’s symposium will focus on the influence the Mohawk River has on the Estuary by highlighting the environmental and cultural influences. Presentations will cover a wide range of topics including the geologic history of the Mohawk River, the Mohawk River Valley as a source of nutrients and sediments to the Estuary, the history of and current role of the Eric Canal system, the threat from invasive species, the state of fisheries science, and the role of hydropower in managing flow and providing fish passage.

Posters must be related to the Hudson River estuary, the Mohawk River, the NY/NJ Harbor, or their watersheds.
Among possible topics are:
Academic, government and volunteer monitoring programs, resource management program plans, regional, observing networks, climate change, biogeochemistry, land use impacts, ecosystem dynamics, fisheries and wildlife biology, ecosystem change, non-indigenous species, water quality, society and environmental history.

Note that poster board dimensions are 48” x 36” (landscape or portrait, your choice). Though you may
submit more than one poster abstract, HRES may need to limit the total number of posters presented due to
available space.

All abstract submissions must include the following:
1. Principal investigator (PI): name, mailing address, phone, and email address;
2. Names and affiliations of all Co-PIs;
3. Poster Title;
4. Abstract of 250 words or less;
5. Poster type: undergraduate student, graduate student, or other
6. If PI is a student, include requested travel funds and expense types (see below).

Abstracts must be submitted by Friday March 18, 2016 to: chuck.nieder@dec.ny.gov

Questions? Contact Chuck Nieder at 518-402-9216

Thursday, March 17, 2016

Stephen Fan
Connecticut College

"SubUrbanisms"
Preston  The dramatic expansion of the historically marginalized gaming industry has led to a proliferation of casinos in the American landscape. Casinos now draw concentrated flows of capital, goods, and people into the urban periphery throughout the country. In regions with existing Asian populations, these flows of casino patrons and workers have also brought recent Chinese immigrants into these sub-urban areas. 

By framing the expansion of the gaming industry in terms of the unique types of urbanization that have emerged within existing sub-urban communities, SubUrbanisms explores the ways in which these casino company towns and china towns challenge the cultural assumptions, values, and norms rooted in the American suburban landscape. By documenting, interpreting, and speculating upon these urban transformations of the suburban fabric, SubUrbanisms provides alternative models to address the
sustainabilities of American suburban living, as well as alternative understandings of hybrids, adaptive reuse, and informal, user-oriented, and bottom-up approaches to design. 
 

Thursday, March 17, 2016

Dutchess County Trails Roundtable


Farm and Home Center located at 2715 Route 44 in Millbrook  The meeting will be the first of the 2016 quarterly roundtables and will focus on organizing county-wide events for National Trails Day, held annually on the first Saturday in June. An agenda will be released prior to the meeting date.
Whether you want to propose a short length of hiking trail to your local park or are already well at work establishing regional trails, there is a place for you at the table.To learn more about past and upcoming meetings and to access meeting agendas and summaries, click here.
This county-wide forum fosters the development of trails on a local and regional scale through networking, information sharing, and helping trails projects to access financial resources and technical assistance. Officials, trail committees, and the general public are encouraged to attend. All are welcome! 

Please RSVP to Karissa Stokdal at info@winnakee.org
 

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Call for Posters/Papers: Second Annual Student Research Conference on Asia and the Environment


Undergraduate and graduate students engaged in research related to Asia and the environment are invited to submit posters and papers for presentation at this second annual conference.

Today it is impossible to think seriously about the challenges of sustainable development and the environment without understanding the local and global environmental footprint of rapid economic growth in Asia—and the Asian response. At the same time, Asian Studies students increasingly require familiarity with the scientific, cultural, and political dimensions of environmental crises and sustainable development.

With the support of the Henry Luce Foundation, Bard College is sponsoring this second annual student research conference, providing a venue for students to present undergraduate, masters and PhD level research at the intersection of these critical issues. The conference seeks to shed critical light on how we all might live sustainably—or not—in a 2050 world with three billion more people, limited resources, a thickening blanket of carbon dioxide heating the planet, and a global economic development process increasingly defined by Asian models and leadership.
 
The conference will be held April 14 and 15 on the campus of Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, NY in the scenic Hudson Valley, which is easily accessible by train from New York City. There is no charge for Bard students.
 
To learn more about the conference, please sign up for our mailing list here.

To submit a paper for a panel, or an idea for a poster presentation, please send a one paragraph abstract to jofrench@bard.edu. Undergraduate students must also include a letter of support from a professor.

Proposals will be accepted through March 15, 2016.

Friday, March 11, 2016

Film Screening: Trees in Trouble


Cary Institute  Trees in Trouble tells the story of America's urban and community forests: their history, their growing importance to our health, economy, and environment - and the serious threats they now face from invasive pests and pathogens.
Through stories of everyday people on the frontlines of change, the film showcases how community efforts can save and protect our urban forests for future generations. Designed for audiences of all ages, Trees in Trouble inspires viewers to take action.
"Trees in Trouble tells the story of Cincinnati's response to the emerald ash borer. However, across the country, from Massachusetts to San Diego, Minneapolis to Charleston, thousands of communities face the same threat: valuable and beloved trees being killed by non-native insects or diseases. Trees in Trouble helps us understand what we are losing and links us to actions we can take to counter this tragedy." -Faith Campbell, Vice President, Center for Invasive Species Prevention
A Q&A with filmmaker Andrea Torrice and forest ecologist Gary Lovett will follow the screening.

www.treesintrouble.com
 


Friday, March 11, 2016

Natural History Walks with Tom O'Dowd and Bard Arboretum Staff


Location Varies  Join Tom's tutorial group every Friday for walks focused on learning natural history and plant identification!

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Film Screenings at the Roosevelt-Vanderbilt National Historic Site


Roosevelt-Vanderbilt National Historic Site  A film screening of "The Messenger" (the current plight of song birds) and a film on Biomimicry , on April 9, 2016 at Roosevelt-Vanderbilt National Historic Site at the Henry A. Wallace Education & Visitors Center. For reservations and to print your free tickets please go to the Eventbrite website below. 

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/roosevelt -vanderbilt - nhs-natural-resource-lecture-program-series-film-viewing- the-messenger-tickets- 22361916093?utm -medium= discovery&utm-campaign=social&utm -content= at tendeeshare & utm -source=cp&utm -term=listing 
 

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

What's In Your Trash?

Want to be a Kline trash detective?
Kline Commons  Come to New Kline and see the wonder that can be found in our trash. Join EcoReps as they sort through the grey bins. Gross? Disgusting? It'll definitely be fun and informative.

Recyclemania at Bard—more than just recycling

Friday, March 4, 2016

Natural History Walks with Tom O'Dowd and Bard Arboretum Staff


Location Varies  Join Tom's tutorial group every Friday for walks focused on learning natural history and plant identification!

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story

Presented by Bard EATS
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  Just Eat It is a film that asks: where is your food going?

Filmmakers and food lovers Jen and Grant dive into the issue of food waste from farm, through retail, all the way to the back of their own fridge. After catching a glimpse of the billions of dollars of good food that is tossed each year in North America, they pledge to quit grocery shopping and survive only on discarded food. What they find is truly shocking.  

Snacks provided by Bard EATS
Discussion following screeing

Friday, February 26, 2016

Natural History Walks with Tom O'Dowd and Bard Arboretum Staff


Location Varies  Join Tom's tutorial group every Friday for walks focused on learning natural history and plant identification!

Friday, February 26, 2016

Dish Amnesty Day (RECYCLEMANIA)

Bring Kline dishes back to Kline
Kline Commons  During all meals at Kline this Friday - if you bring any KLINE dishes you find on campus, in an office or even in the woods, the EcoReps will reward you with a cookie or a commemorative Bostein Buck. 

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

The Hudson: A River at Risk


Campus Center, Weis Cinema  On Tuesday February 16th at 6pm, The Bard Center for Environmental Policy, The Bard Environmental and Urban Studies Department, and the Bard College Sustainability Council present a screening of three short films collectively titled The Hudson: A RIver at Risk by Jon Bowermaster. Discussion to follow with the filmmaker.

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS

Jon has been making documentary films about water for years and recently played a large role in galvanizing advocacy for New York's anti-fracking movement with his film Dear Gov. Cuomo and he is now at work on a new feature addressing federal policy on the issue called Dear President Obama.

The screening will feature the shorts:
Bomb Trains on the Hudson
The Long Shadow of Indian Point
High Voltage/Dark Shadow
PCBs: G.E.’s Toxic Legacy (World Premiere)
Dear President Obama (Feature Preview)

Regarding The Hudson: A River at Risk, Jon writes on the site hudsonriveratrisk.com, "Specifically we wanted to take a close-up look at three distinct risks:The so-called “bomb trains” carrying a highly explosive gas and oil mix along the riverside from the shale fields of North Dakota to Albany and to Philadelphia; the 50-year-old nuclear power plant at Indian Point, which continues to operate even as its infrastructure ages; and the rebuilding of the Tappan Zee Bridge, currently the largest construction project in North American with a potential to create serious environmental harm if not closely monitored."

There will be a panel following the shorts which run about an hour in total combined featuring:

Eban Goodstein, Director Bard CEP
Jeremy Cherson, Riverkeeper, Bard CEP '15
Andy Bicking, Scenic Hudson
Jon Bowermaster, Filmmaker 

The screening is free but please register on Eventbrite to reserve a seat.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability:
Open House in New York City

Attendees receive $65 application fee waiver!
New York City  Join us in New York City for an Open House hosted by the Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability. Admissions staff, faculty, and current students will be on hand to provide an overview of the programs offered, answer questions, and share tips on how to make your application stand out. 

REGISTER HERE

This event will be held in our New York City classroom located at ImpactHub NYC, 394 Broadway, New York, NY 10013

Email Caitlin O'Donnell with any questions.

 

Monday, February 8, 2016

EUS Colloquium: "Climate Policy Post Paris: Student Action to Change the Future”


Olin, Room 102  Eban Goodstein, Director, Bard Center for Environmental Policy

"Climate Policy Post Paris: Student Action to Change the Future”

Last December, for the first time, both the US and China made major commitments to cut global warming pollution. President Obama promised that the US would reduce emissions by 30% below 2005 levels by 2030. Combined with the action in other countries, if all the commitments are borne out, the world will move from an 8 degree F future warming, to a 6 degree F scenario. Also, under the Paris accords, countries are supposed to return in 2020 with a new round of proposed cuts to get us closer to limiting warming to 4 degrees F.  This talk will focus on how we got to this point, and what students and citizens cans do now to be part of changing the future. The talk closes with a focus on the Power Dialog, a national initiative spearheaded by the Bard Center for Environmental Policy to engage students nationwide in face-to-face discussion with state policy-makers in charge of implementing the US commitment in Paris.

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Red Hook Trails Plan Meeting (session 2)


Watts dePeyster Hall  Two open house meetings to present the draft Red Hook Trail Plan. The first session will be from 4:00pm - 5:30pm at the Red Hook High School and the second session will take place from 6:00pm - 7:30pm at Watts dePeyster Hall in Tivoli. Please stop by one of the two sessions to give us your feedback on the proposed trail system and recommendations.
Info: redhooktrailplan.weebly.com

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Red Hook Trails Plan Meeting


Red Hook High School  Two open house meetings to present the draft Red Hook Trail Plan. The first session will be from 4:00pm - 5:30pm at the Red Hook High School and the second session will take place from 6:00pm - 7:30pm at Watts dePeyster Hall in Tivoli. Please stop by one of the two sessions to give us your feedback on the proposed trail system and recommendations.
Info: redhooktrailplan.weebly.com

Monday, February 1, 2016

Saw Kill Watershed Community: First Community Meeting!


Red Hook Village Hall  Bard faculty, staff, and students are collaborating with other residents of our local watershed to discuss water quality, environmental education, and environmental stewardship. The Saw Kill is our source of drinking water! Red Hook Village Hall, 7-9PM.
Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/431980280328438/

Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Program & Admissions Webinar: Bard Center for Environmental Policy 

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
Online  Bard Center for Environmental Policy holds regular webinars featuring faculty, students, and alumni speaking about their work.

January Webinar: The Bard CEP Mission and Power Dialog
Faculty: Eban Goodstein

What will be covered?
Webinars feature the above mentioned faculty and/or student and alumni speaking about their research and work with Bard Center for Environmental Policy. We also give a brief program overview and cover admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Details on attending a webinar:
No registration is required. To join simply click on the webinar link 5 minutes before the date and time of the webinar you wish to attend, and enter your Full Name as a "guest" (only your first name will be displayed). A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. A high speed internet connection is required. 

Webinar Link: http://bard.adobeconnect.com/gpswebinar/

Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy


Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve)
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)