EUS Events

+ EUS News

 

Upcoming Events


Earth Week

Sunday, April 22 – Thursday, April 26, 2018
 Bard College Campus

Celebrating Planet Earth with a week of events created to have fun and raise awareness for our beautiful green home and all it provides.

Earth Week 2018 Schedule of Events:

Saturday, April 21
  • 6:00pm—Bard Alumni Lecture: Dr. Liita-lyaloo Cairney, BA/MS '08
    on her social entrepreneuship Journey in Nambia
    Blithewood Manor
Sunday, April 22
  • 1:00–3:00pm—Foraging Walk with Expert Dina Falconi '87
    on her social entrepreneuship Journey in Nambia
    Hance Cottage, Faculty Circle
  • 4:30–7:30pm—Food Waste Audit
    Kline
Monday, April 23
  • 11:30am – 3:30pm—Meatless Monday
    on her social entrepreneuship Journey in Nambia
    Kline Dining Hall
  • 3:30–4:30pm—Seed Planting
    RSVP for Shuttle to: https://tinyurl.com/EarthWeekSeeds/
    Montgomery Place Greenhouse
Tuesday, April 24Wednesday, April 25
  • 11:30am – 1:30pm—Intuitive Cooking on the Fly with Chef Nadine
    Kline Dining Hall
  • 4:00–6:00pm—Sauerkraut and Kimchi Making
    RSVP to: https://tinyurl.com/EarthWeekKimchi/
    Montgomery Place Orchards
Thursday, April 26
  • 11:30am – 8:00pm—Free-Use Store, Open All Day
  • 2:00–3:00pm—Ginger Chews and Spring Edibles
    RSVP to: https://tinyurl.com/EarthWeekSeeds/
    Campus Center Lobby
  • 5:30–8:00pm—WASTED Screening and Panel
    Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Friday, April 27
  • 8:15—Bike to Bard
    Meet at Taste Buds
  • 11:00am – 5:30pm—EUS Film Festival
    Campus Center, Weis Cinema
  • 1:00–4:00pm—Hike and Write
    Tivoli Bay Trails
  • 2:00–3:30pm—Arbor Day Tree Planting
    Campus Center, North Path
  • 2:00pm—BOS Bike Ride
    Meet at Kline Bus Stop and End a Bard Farm
  • 4:00–7:00pm—Bard Farm Happy Hour
    Music, Food, and Beer (for those over 21)
    Bard Farm
Saturday, April 28
 

Contact: Andrea Otey  ao3194@bard.edu  404-617-3556

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability: Open House in New York City

Thursday, April 26, 2018
6:30 pm – 8:30 pm LMHQ NYC

Attendees receive a $65 application fee waiver! RSVP: HERE

Join us in New York City for an Open House hosted by the Bard MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy.

Attendees will hear from a panel of current students and alumni of Bard's MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy. Our Panel of student/alum experts will discuss topics such as:

  • career outcomes -- how the MS degrees at CEP and MBA in Sustainability have led to impactful sustainability careers
  • the program experience -- highlights on courses and key features at Bard (including the NYCLab course and the CEP internship)
  • how to get the most of your graduate school journey -- career development + student engagement opportunities at Bard
  • how to make your application stand out -- tips on perfecting your application materials, advice on getting through the graduate school admissions process
In addition: Program Director Eban Goodstein will provide an overview of the program offerings at Bard CEP and the MBA in Sustainability.

Our Admissions staff will also be on hand to provide information on the application process and answer questions regarding:
  • how to complete and submit your application
  • financial aid opportunities
  • successfully completing program prerequisites 

Event Location: This event will be held at LMHQ, 150 Broadway NY, NY Floor 20

Email Caitlin O'Donnell with any additional questions.

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

Earth Week: EUS Film Festival

Friday, April 27 – Saturday, April 28, 2018
11:00 am – 5:30 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema

Please join us on April 27 to celebrate the culmination Earth Week with an EUS film festival. We will be screening Blue Vinyl: A Toxic Comedy, Hope on the Hudson, Green Fire, and Up the Yangtze. Contact Clara Woolner for a full schedule of the film screenings. 

Sponsor: Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact: Clara Woolner  cwoolner@bard.edu  845-758-6822

EUS Advising Day Celebration

Monday, April 30, 2018
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Montgomery Place Portico

Meet with Faculty and EUS Students about New Courses and Fall Offerings

Refreshments will be served.

A shuttle will be available to transport guests to and from Montgomery Place, leaving the Kline bus stop between 3:45 and 4:15 pm and leaving Montgomery Place between 5:30 and 6 pm.

 

Sponsor: Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact: Michele Dominy  mdominy@bard.edu  845-758-7870

Informational Webinar: Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Tuesday, May 1, 2018
7:30 pm – 8:30 pm Online

Join and receive a $65 application fee waiver!
        

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds online informational webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA in Sustainability and Center for Environmental Policy programs. 

ABOUT
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Join a live information session with Director Goodstein and the admissions team and ask questions directly of the Bard team. 

WHAT WILL BE COVERED?  

  • Overview of graduate program offerings
  • Alumni success and career outcomes
  • Admissions information
  • Prerequisite course requirements
  • Peace Corps and AmeriCorps programs
  • Financial aid availability
  • Tips for a standout application 
DEGREE OPTIONS
Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability
 
Dual Degree Options Include:
MS/JD with Pace Law School 
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching 
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability 

Peace Corps Programs Include:
Master's International (before you serve) 
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)  

A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. Email Caitlin O'Donnell for further details.
For more information, call 845-758-7073.

<<<< REGISTER HERE FOR LINK >>>>

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Bard MBA in Sustainability
Contact: Caitlin O'Donnell  codonnel@bard.edu  845-758-7073
Website: Event Website

National Climate Seminar: Will Western Forests (as we know them) Survive Climate Change?

Wednesday, May 9, 2018
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm https://bluejeans.com/465542196

Dr. Camille Stevens-Rumann, Colorado State University

Join Bard CEP on May 9th for a conversation on the ecology of forest fires, following a season of some of the worst wildfires in the West, and how it relates to climate change. 

Dr. Camille Stevens-Rumann is an assistant professor in the Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship. Her research focuses on ecosystem recovery following large disturbances. 
 
BARD CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY 
 
The  Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability  offer masters programs in  Environmental Policy,  Climate Science and  Policy, and Sustainable Business.  The Bard Center for Environmental Policy's career-focused, science based, interdisciplinary masters of science programs are located in New York’s beautiful Hudson Valley.  The rigorous first year coursework, followed by a required 4-6 month immersive internship, culminates with a Master’s Capstone Project and a 93% job placement rate within 6 months of graduation. Graduates are currently pursuing careers in many fields such as: alternative energy, international Development, advocacy/lobbying, conservation, research, and strategic consulting. For more information: bard.edu/cep/ 

Webinar:  https://bluejeans.com/750938911
Dial-in Only: +1.408.740.7256 
Meeting ID: 750 938 911

Sponsor: Bard Center for Environmental Policy
Contact: Eban Goodstein  ebangood@bard.edu Website: Event Website

EUS Senior Projects Planning Dinner for Junior 2s

Wednesday, May 9, 2018
5:30 pm – 7:00 pm Anne Cox Chambers Alumni Center

Sponsor: Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact: Michele Dominy  mdominy@bard.edu  845-758-7870

Waste Cluster II Final Project Presentations

Wednesday, May 16, 2018
1:30 pm – 4:30 pm Fisher Seminar Room

Sponsor: Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact: Michele Dominy  mdominy@bard.edu  845-758-7870

EUS Senior Project Presentations

Thursday, May 17, 2018
1:30 pm – 5:00 pm Campus Center, Weis Cinema

Sponsor: Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact: Michele Dominy  mdominy@bard.edu  845-758-7870

EUS 203: Geographic Information Systems Student Presentations

Friday, May 18, 2018
10:30 am – 12:00 pm Campus Center, Multipurpose Room

Sponsor: Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact: Susan Winchell-Sweeney  sweeney@bard.edu

EUS Student Practicum Presentations

Monday, May 21, 2018
1:30 pm – 3:50 pm Montgomery Place Portico

Presentations for EUS Practicum: Montgomery Place and Landscape Design—Just What Is Landscape?

Sponsor: Environmental and Urban Studies Program
Contact: Michele Dominy  mdominy@bard.edu  845-758-7870

 

Archive of Past Events

                      

2013

Thursday, December 19, 2013

Community Dinner at Feitler House

Feitler Co-op vegetarian community dinner, all welcome!
Feitler House  Feitler House neighborhood is a student-run vegetarian cooperative, housing 10 Upper College students. Residents share responsibility for all cleaning and meal preparation, and make decisions by consensus. Admission to the co-op is by application from Upper College students only.

Thursday, December 19, 2013

Environmental Collective


Root Cellar  The Environmental Collective (EC) is a student-run organization for the promotion of social justice, environmental welfare, and economic security on-campus and beyond. In the past, we have installed water bottle filters, screened documentaries, promoted ecological policies on campus, hosted call-ins for national climate legislation and collaborated with local citizen groups for international days of action. So far this semester we are planning on fixing up previously installed water bottle filters, sending members to Power Shift 2013 and taking action in the Bard College Fossil Fuel campaign. While plans for this semester are strong, they are also flexible and contingent upon the enthusiastic consent, and active engagement of our members. We are always receptive to new faces and ideas, so stop by whenever you can.

Thursday, December 19, 2013

Effects of Human Disturbances on Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling in River Networks


RKC 111  A lecture by Madeleine Mineau, candidate for the position in Environmental Science

My research is focused on understanding the effects of human disturbances, such as land use and climate change, atmospheric pollution, and invasive species, on ecosystem function and water quality in river networks. Nutrient pollution due to human activities is associated with eutrophication and “dead zones”, contamination of drinking water, and economic impacts on tourism and property values. It is therefore important to further our understanding of nutrient cycling and processing in river systems to improve the management of water resources to maximize water quality and maintain a high quality of life.

A current focus of my research aims to model the effects of forecasted land development and climate change on the loading and processing of nitrogen (N) in river networks. I am using the Framework for Aquatic Modeling in Earth Systems (FrAMES), which is a spatially distributed and time varying hydrologic model coupled with aquatic biogeochemical models. I am examining issues such as the effect of the spatial distribution of development within coastal watersheds on the river network’s capacity to process and remove N. Furthermore, I am collaborating with social scientists to investigate public perceptions of water quality issues to identify misconceptions and knowledge gaps to improve water quality management.

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Eco-Reps Biweekly Meeting

Students for Sustainability
Olin, Room 205  Biweekly meetings on September 17, October 1, October 15, October 23, November 6, November 20, December 4, and December 18.

These meetings are held to discuss upcoming Eco-Rep events, related volunteer opportunities, new Eco-Rep manuel passages, concerns about recycle bins in dorms and other Eco-Rep related activities. 

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Beyond the Banks: Investigating the Influence of Water Quality on Air Quality in the Hudson River Estuary


Hegeman 106  A lecture by M. Elias Dueker 
candidate for the position in Environmental Science

Urban water bodies, such as the lower Hudson River Estuary (HRE), often receive high levels of microbial contamination through the release of untreated sewage. Bubbles bursting at the water’s surface release microscopic particles (aerosols) into the air, providing a mechanism for water quality to influence urban air quality. Bubbles are introduced to surface waters through wind-wave interactions, wave-shore interactions, boating, and environmental remediation efforts.

My urban ecological research has confirmed the transfer of bacteria from HRE surface waters to waterfront air, including sewage-associated bacteria, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and asthma-inducing endotoxins. These findings have important ecological and public health implications. The delivery of viable bacteria and chemical compounds from water surfaces to the air and eventually to land represents a direction of inter-ecosystem transfer not usually considered. The aerosolization of contaminated HRE waters into urban airspace greatly expands the potential for human health impacts, potentially requiring a new approach to the management of air and water resources in the urban environment.

Monday, December 16, 2013

“Larry’s Clique”: A Predatory Machine in the Housing Market

 
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  “How to make money out of poor and near-poor minorities?” is a question that housing professionals in low-income minority neighborhoods ask themselves. “How to make the most, or how to take advantage, of the housing market?” is a pressing issue that local populations in these areas address in various manners. The housing market in low-income minority neighborhoods is a strategic field. Landlords, tenants, housing lawyers, real estate brokers, legal aid societies, and housing judges develop economic circuits where modes of making money have both formal and informal (and sometimes illegal) sides, where interests align in surprising ways, where moral boundaries between fair exchange and exploitive economic practice are redefined. There is a whole ecology of highly local, half-hidden, transactions and struggles that the literature on the housing market has missed and that scholars of the poor and near-poor’s economic life rarely penetrate.

In the talk, I draw upon almost three years of ethnographic fieldwork in an informal group of housing actors in New York City, which I call “Larry’s clique”. I argue that the housing market in low-income minority areas is unevenly organized around “local predatory machines” similar to Larry’s group. These machines look for unsuspecting tenants and isolated landlords to prey upon and to make money from. Doing so, they create a series of “patronage networks” in the areas where they operate, revealing a local structure of opportunities and constraints for inhabitants in low-income neighborhoods. The focus on Larry’s clique gives insights not only into how the housing market works in these neighborhoods (shedding new light on gentrification and housing policy), but also, more generally, it renews our understanding of the community life of poor and near-poor minorities in contemporary American cities.

Saturday, December 14, 2013

Webinar: Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Join and receive application fee waiver!
Online  Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds admission webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA and CEP programs. 

What will be covered?
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Details on attending a webinar...
No registration is required. To join simply click on the webinar link 5 minutes before the date and time of the webinar you wish to attend, and enter your Full Name as a "guest" (only your first name will be displayed). A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. A high speed internet connection and phone are required. Phone calls are toll free. (International students must contact us to get details on dialing into the webinar.)

Webinar Link: http://bard.adobeconnect.com/gpswebinar/

Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability

Dual Degree Options Include:

MS/JD with Pace Law School
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability

Peace Corps Programs Include:

Master's International (before you serve)
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)

Friday, December 13, 2013

Brazil’s Belo Monte Dam and the Struggle for Political Voice


Olin, Room 102 
The Belo Monte hydroelectric facility, located in the Brazilian Amazon, will be the world’s third largest dam when completed in 2019. This energy project is touted as a sustainable development initiative, but its construction is bringing rapid social and environmental changes to the urban centers closest to the construction site, disproportionately affecting marginalized communities through displacement, rising prices, and inadequate government services. In this context, I examine the factors that enable and constrain dam-affected people as they make demands for their rights, highlighting the importance of collective imaginations of the future. I argue that effective translation, or the reframing of these imagined futures into language and demands that can be understood and acted upon by others, is a necessary step in addressing the needs of the most marginalized.

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Community Dinner at Feitler House

Feitler Co-op vegetarian community dinner, all welcome!
Feitler House  Feitler House neighborhood is a student-run vegetarian cooperative, housing 10 Upper College students. Residents share responsibility for all cleaning and meal preparation, and make decisions by consensus. Admission to the co-op is by application from Upper College students only.

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Webinar: Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Join and receive application fee waiver!
Online  Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds admission webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA and CEP programs. 

What will be covered?
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Details on attending a webinar...
No registration is required. To join simply click on the webinar link 5 minutes before the date and time of the webinar you wish to attend, and enter your Full Name as a "guest" (only your first name will be displayed). A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. A high speed internet connection and phone are required. Phone calls are toll free.

Webinar Link: http://bard.adobeconnect.com/gpswebinar/

Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability

Dual Degree Options Include:

MS/JD with Pace Law School
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability

Peace Corps Programs Include:

Master's International (before you serve)
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Environmental Collective


Root Cellar  The Environmental Collective (EC) is a student-run organization for the promotion of social justice, environmental welfare, and economic security on-campus and beyond. In the past, we have installed water bottle filters, screened documentaries, promoted ecological policies on campus, hosted call-ins for national climate legislation and collaborated with local citizen groups for international days of action. So far this semester we are planning on fixing up previously installed water bottle filters, sending members to Power Shift 2013 and taking action in the Bard College Fossil Fuel campaign. While plans for this semester are strong, they are also flexible and contingent upon the enthusiastic consent, and active engagement of our members. We are always receptive to new faces and ideas, so stop by whenever you can.

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Ecological Feedbacks to Global Change:A Terrestrial Ecosystems Perspective


RKC 111  A lecture by Seeta Sistla, candidate for the position in Environmental Science

As the climate warms and resource demand grows, ecological change is occurring at unprecedented rates globally. Projecting the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to global change factors is of growing concern because these ecosystems are fundamental regulators of the global carbon, nutrient, and water cycles, as well as agricultural productivity. A major challenge facing ecologists is the task of accounting for the suite of stabilizing and destabilizing feedbacks between the plant and the soil systems that collectively govern terrestrial ecosystem responses to perturbation. Using theoretical, field, laboratory, and modeling approaches, my research seeks to identify the mechanisms underlying terrestrial ecosystem responses to global change factors and their consequences for ecosystem function.

Much of my research is focused in the Arctic, which is a critical component of the global carbon cycle because this biome stores nearly half of the world’s soil carbon (almost double the carbon in the atmosphere). Cold temperatures suppress soil breakdown, promoting Arctic soil carbon build up. However, the Arctic is experiencing the highest rate of warming globally, which may accelerate decomposition, driving the release of soil carbon as potent greenhouse gasses, including carbon dioxide and methane. I will present results from the longest-running tundra ecosystem warming experiment in existence (initiated in Alaska in 1989) that examines the consequences of warming on Arctic carbon cycling. I will also discuss how I am applying this research framework beyond the Arctic to more directly coupled human-natural systems, through a new project documenting how changing land use practices in response to rapid globalization impact agricultural biodiversity, soil biodiversity, and crop productivity in the Neotropics.

Monday, December 9, 2013

Outswimming the Sharks: Local activism in a national movement to stop predatory home lending


Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 
What do activists do when facing a supposedly unstoppable force? In the context of the housing boom of the last decade, efforts to limit abuses in the so-called sub prime home lending market were complicated by rising home ownership and rapidly growing industry profits. In this talk I examine how advocacy and nonprofit organizations mobilized to confront a problem with local consequences but extra-local causes.

I focus on the development of city and state anti-predatory lending laws intended to limit abuses, and the subsequent push-back against these efforts. Using legal cases, interviews, and documents by advocates, industry representatives, and policy-makers, I argue that debates between supporters and opponents were as much about scale as they were about the particular laws themselves. In other words, the question was whether cities and states should even have the power to regulate lending. Finally, I argue that the legal outcomes of these debates reshaped the home lending market, with consequences for the larger economy.

Thursday, December 5, 2013

Community Dinner at Feitler House

Feitler Co-op vegetarian community dinner, all welcome!
Feitler House  Feitler House neighborhood is a student-run vegetarian cooperative, housing 10 Upper College students. Residents share responsibility for all cleaning and meal preparation, and make decisions by consensus. Admission to the co-op is by application from Upper College students only.

Thursday, December 5, 2013

Environmental Collective


Root Cellar  The Environmental Collective (EC) is a student-run organization for the promotion of social justice, environmental welfare, and economic security on-campus and beyond. In the past, we have installed water bottle filters, screened documentaries, promoted ecological policies on campus, hosted call-ins for national climate legislation and collaborated with local citizen groups for international days of action. So far this semester we are planning on fixing up previously installed water bottle filters, sending members to Power Shift 2013 and taking action in the Bard College Fossil Fuel campaign. While plans for this semester are strong, they are also flexible and contingent upon the enthusiastic consent, and active engagement of our members. We are always receptive to new faces and ideas, so stop by whenever you can.

Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Eco-Reps Biweekly Meeting

Students for Sustainability
Olin, Room 205  Biweekly meetings on September 17, October 1, October 15, October 23, November 6, November 20, December 4, and December 18.

These meetings are held to discuss upcoming Eco-Rep events, related volunteer opportunies, new Eco-Rep manuel passages, concerns about recycle bins in dorms and other Eco-Rep related activities. 

Monday, December 2, 2013

Slow Loris Conservation in Vietnam: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Address a Complex Conservation Problem

Mary Blair, American Museum of Natural History
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Mary Blair, Ph.D., is Assistant Director for Research and Strategic Planning at the American Museum of Natural History’s Center for Biodiversity and Conservation (CBC) and an NSF Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability (SEES) Fellow.

The Center for Biodiversity and Conservation (CBC) has engaged in scientific research to inform conservation in Vietnam since 1997, resulting in over 42 new species described. Most recently, CBC began a project to inform and improve the conservation management of slow lorises, which are small, nocturnal primates. The greatest threat to the survival of slow lorises is the illegal wildlife trade; they are in high demand across their range for traditional medicines, as pets, and for food. By studying populations found in protected areas across Vietnam and nearby wildlife markets, CBC scientists have been gathering the basic biological data that are necessary for conservation managers to more effectively protect these species. CBC is now embarking on a new dimension of this project in collaboration with Dr. Gautam Sethi at Bard, to integrate biological approaches with econometrics to better understand the nature of the wildlife trade in Vietnam and its impacts on slow loris populations. Multidisciplinary approaches such as these are increasingly necessary and appropriate to solve today’s complex conservation challenges.

More on Mary Blair


Thursday, November 28, 2013

Community Dinner at Feitler House

Feitler Co-op vegetarian community dinner, all welcome!
Feitler House  Feitler House neighborhood is a student-run vegetarian cooperative, housing 10 Upper College students. Residents share responsibility for all cleaning and meal preparation, and make decisions by consensus. Admission to the co-op is by application from Upper College students only.

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Environmental Collective


Root Cellar  The Environmental Collective (EC) is a student-run organization for the promotion of social justice, environmental welfare, and economic security on-campus and beyond. In the past, we have installed water bottle filters, screened documentaries, promoted ecological policies on campus, hosted call-ins for national climate legislation and collaborated with local citizen groups for international days of action. So far this semester we are planning on fixing up previously installed water bottle filters, sending members to Power Shift 2013 and taking action in the Bard College Fossil Fuel campaign. While plans for this semester are strong, they are also flexible and contingent upon the enthusiastic consent, and active engagement of our members. We are always receptive to new faces and ideas, so stop by whenever you can.

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Community Dinner at Feitler House

Feitler Co-op vegetarian community dinner, all welcome!
Feitler House  Feitler House neighborhood is a student-run vegetarian cooperative, housing 10 Upper College students. Residents share responsibility for all cleaning and meal preparation, and make decisions by consensus. Admission to the co-op is by application from Upper College students only.

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Environmental Collective


Root Cellar  The Environmental Collective (EC) is a student-run organization for the promotion of social justice, environmental welfare, and economic security on-campus and beyond. In the past, we have installed water bottle filters, screened documentaries, promoted ecological policies on campus, hosted call-ins for national climate legislation and collaborated with local citizen groups for international days of action. So far this semester we are planning on fixing up previously installed water bottle filters, sending members to Power Shift 2013 and taking action in the Bard College Fossil Fuel campaign. While plans for this semester are strong, they are also flexible and contingent upon the enthusiastic consent, and active engagement of our members. We are always receptive to new faces and ideas, so stop by whenever you can.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Eco-Reps Biweekly Meeting

Students for Sustainability
Olin, Room 205  Biweekly meetings on September 17, October 1, October 15, October 23, November 6, November 20, December 4, and December 18.

These meetings are held to discuss upcoming Eco-Rep events, related volunteer opportunies, new Eco-Rep manuel passages, concerns about recycle bins in dorms and other Eco-Rep related activities. 

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The Origins of Globalization: Explorers, Merchants and Missionaries

A Lecture Series by David Swanson


Olin, Room 102  This lecture series introduces key issues that emerged during the original period of globalization, that is, the discovery, understanding, and organization of the geographic and human linkages binding the territories and peoples of our planet.

Lectures in this series take place on November 12, 13, and 19.

Lecture Ill: Testing the Limits
In the most recent phase of globalization, previous structures of colonialism are rejected, and new efforts are made to test the limits of the Earth's geography, both at the peaks of the Himalaya and the depths of the oceans' trenches, inspired and complemented by the 20th century's surge in scientific exploration.

David Swanson has served as CEO of one of the world's largest commodities merchandising firms and as president of the Explorers Club, leading expeditions into Burma, Paraguay, and Tibet. He studied history at Harvard College and the University of Chicago.

Monday, November 18, 2013

Film Screening of Gasland II by Josh Fox


Olin, Room 102  Bard CEP first-year students will host a special screening of Josh Fox's Gasland II on Monday, November 18th at 9:30am, just two weeks before Josh Fox joins us for the National Climate Seminar. We hope you can make it!

About the Film
Watch the Trailer

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Community Dinner at Feitler House

Feitler Co-op vegetarian community dinner, all welcome!
Feitler House  Feitler House neighborhood is a student-run vegetarian cooperative, housing 10 Upper College students. Residents share responsibility for all cleaning and meal preparation, and make decisions by consensus. Admission to the co-op is by application from Upper College students only.

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Webinar: Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Join and receive application fee waiver!
Online  Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds admission webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA and CEP programs. 

What will be covered?
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Details on attending a webinar...
No registration is required. To join simply click on the webinar link 5 minutes before the date and time of the webinar you wish to attend, and enter your Full Name as a "guest" (only your first name will be displayed). A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. A high speed internet connection and phone are required. Phone calls are toll free.

Webinar Link: http://bard.adobeconnect.com/gpswebinar/

Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability

Dual Degree Options Include:

MS/JD with Pace Law School
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability

Peace Corps Programs Include:

Master's International (before you serve)
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Environmental Collective


Root Cellar  The Environmental Collective (EC) is a student-run organization for the promotion of social justice, environmental welfare, and economic security on-campus and beyond. In the past, we have installed water bottle filters, screened documentaries, promoted ecological policies on campus, hosted call-ins for national climate legislation and collaborated with local citizen groups for international days of action. So far this semester we are planning on fixing up previously installed water bottle filters, sending members to Power Shift 2013 and taking action in the Bard College Fossil Fuel campaign. While plans for this semester are strong, they are also flexible and contingent upon the enthusiastic consent, and active engagement of our members. We are always receptive to new faces and ideas, so stop by whenever you can.

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Epistemology of the Lifeboat

Life of Pi and Queer Fabulation
Reem-Kayden Center  Presented by Tavia Nyong’o

Life of Pi (Yann Martel, 2001) is a widely acclaimed Canadian novel that purports to tell a story that will make the reader believe in God. Who could resist such a dare in a post-secular age like ours? This talk, however, does not focus on the spiritual propadeutics of the novel. Instead it takes up two matters Life of Pi attempts to push as far as possible to the margin: matters of race and matters of sexuality. How does this story — written by and told to a white man seeking Indian enlightenment — differ from its rightfully impugned colonial precursors? And why does a contemporary novel — written well after Stonewall and the long, dark reign of the closet — still repeat certain classically homophobic structures of disavowal and repudiation? And, finally, of what significance to the contemporary debates surrounding zoopolitics and queer posthumanism is the remarkable detail that these questions bob to the surface of the story about a teenager trapped at sea with a Bengal tiger?

Tavia Nyong’o is Associate Professor of Performance Studies at New York University. His areas of interest include black studies, queer studies, critical theory, popular music studies and cultural critique. His first book, The Amalgamation Waltz: Race, Performance, and the Ruses of Memory (Minnesota, 2009), won the Errol Hill Award for best book in African American theatre and performance studies. Nyong’o has published articles on punk, disco, viral media, the African diaspora, film, and performance art in venues such as Radical History Review, Criticism, TDR: The Journal of Performance Studies, Women & Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory, Women Studies Quarterly, The Nation, and n+1. He is co-editor of the journal Social Text.


Thursday, November 14, 2013

3+2 Info Session / Pizza Lunch


RKC 200  Join Molly Williams and Dr. Eban Goodstein to learn more about Bard Center for Environmental Policy's 3+2 Program for undergraduates. A Pizza Lunch will be provided (with gluten-free and vegan options). 

We look forward to speaking with you then! 


Bard 3+2 Program

Bard College undergraduates may proceed directly from three years of undergraduate study at Bard to one of the two-year master’s degree programs (MS in environmental policy or MS in climate science and policy) outlined here. Interested Bard students should apply in their junior year. Completion of Bard distribution requirements, successful moderation into a program of study, and approval from their undergraduate advisor is required to qualify. Interested students should inquire as soon as possible to ensure they meet all requirements.

Accepted students spend two years at Bard completing the master’s degree. The master’s project, usually in the form of a thesis, serves as the student’s senior project, with an undergraduate advisor serving as the second reader. Graduates of the program receive a B.A. and an M.S. from Bard in five years.

Dane Klinger BA/MS '06

PhD Student, Stanford University

Dane Klinger BA/MS  

“The Bard CEP curriculum provides a broad foundation in the science, economics, and politics behind environmental policy. It prepared me to work across disciplines to better understand and help solve modern environmental problems.”



Wednesday, November 13, 2013

The Origins of Globalization: Explorers, Merchants and Missionaries

A Lecture Series by David Swanson


Olin, Room 102  This lecture series introduces key issues that emerged during the original period of globalization, that is, the discovery, understanding, and organization of the geographic and human linkages binding the territories and peoples of our planet.

Lectures in this series take place on November 12, 13, and 19.

Lecture II: What Went Right and Wrong in the Age of Discovery
The Methods and patterns of globalization implemented by the Spanish are compared to the most sustainable and mutually beneficial expeditions and policies of the English, French, Dutch, and Portuguese.

David Swanson has served as CEO of one of the world's largest commodities merchandising firms and as president of the Explorers Club, leading expeditions into Burma, Paraguay, and Tibet. He studied history at Harvard College and the University of Chicago.

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Open House for Applicants and Interested Students

In New York City. Attendees receive an application fee waiver!
1150 6th Avenue, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10036  Please join us at an Open House in New York City for applicants and interested students to the Bard Center for Environmental Policy and the Bard MBA in Sustainability. Attendees will learn about our programs of study, how to apply, and speak one-on-one with admissions staff, faculty, and students. 

<<<< register here >>>>

TENTATIVE AGENDA
Time Session
6:00 PM Registration and Refreshments
6:30 PM Opening Remarks with Director Goodstein
7:00 PM Break out sessions with Faculty (Bard MBA and Bard CEP held separately)
7:30 PM Program Overview (Bard MBA and Bard CEP held separately)
8:00 PM Student Roundtable


Attendees of the Open House receive a $65 application fee waiver.


Degree Options:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability 

Dual Degree Options:
MS/MBA with Bard MBA 
MS/MAT with Bard MAT 
MS/JD with Pace Law School

Peace Corps Programs:
Master's International Program (for future PCVs)
Paul D. Coverdell Fellows Programs (for RPCVs)

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

The Origins of Globalization: Explorers, Merchants and Missionaries

A Lecture Series by David Swanson
Olin, Room 102  This lecture series introduces key issues that emerged during the original period of globalization, that is, the discovery, understanding, and organization of the geographic and human linkages binding the territories and peoples of our planet.

Lectures in this series take place on November 12, 13, and 19.

Lecture I: From the Unknown to the Known
Did a sustainable, mutually beneficial initiation of globalization begin with Alexander the Great, the Han, the Romans or with the Gulf merchants and the Pax Mongolica?

David Swanson has served as CEO of one of the world's largest commodities merchandising firms and as president of the Explorers Club, leading expeditions into Burma, Paraguay, and Tibet. He studied history at Harvard College and the University of Chicago.

Saturday, November 9, 2013

Webinar: Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Join and receive application fee waiver!
Online  Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds admission webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA and CEP programs. 

What will be covered?
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Details on attending a webinar...
No registration is required. To join simply click on the webinar link 5 minutes before the date and time of the webinar you wish to attend, and enter your Full Name as a "guest" (only your first name will be displayed). A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. A high speed internet connection and phone are required. Phone calls are toll free. (International students must contact us to get details on dialing into the webinar.)

Webinar Link: http://bard.adobeconnect.com/gpswebinar/

Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability

Dual Degree Options Include:

MS/JD with Pace Law School
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability

Peace Corps Programs Include:

Master's International (before you serve)
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)

Friday, November 8, 2013

Artists in Antarctica

Environmental artists Chris Kendall '82 and Elise Engler discuss their work on the cold continent
Fisher Studio Arts Building, Seminar Room  Friday, November 8, 2013 at 11:30 am Chris Kendall will discuss his photography work made while in Antarctica, and at 12:00 pm Elise Engler will discuss her artwork done while in Antarctica.

Fisher Studio Arts Building, Seminar Room

Everyone welcome!

*Co-sponsored by EUS and Studio Arts with support from a Bard
Mellon-Supported Course Development Award.

www.chriskendall.net
and
www.eliseengler.com

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Community Dinner at Feitler House

Feitler Co-op vegetarian community dinner, all welcome!
Feitler House  Feitler House neighborhood is a student-run vegetarian cooperative, housing 10 Upper College students. Residents share responsibility for all cleaning and meal preparation, and make decisions by consensus. Admission to the co-op is by application from Upper College students only.

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Bard Underground: A New Approach to Campus Architecture

With Adam Kalkin and Matthew Quilty
Olin, Room 205  Architect Adam Kalkin and his business partner Matthew Quilty discuss their work designing and building sustainable architecture, including the new Alden Trust Digital Media Lab to be built at Bard in 2014. Their talk will discuss their methods, philosophy, previous projects, and reveal preliminary designs for the Digital Media Lab, which they have been developing together with Bard students, faculty, and staff.

This event is supported in part by a Bard Mellon-Supported Course Development Award.

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Environmental Collective


Root Cellar  The Environmental Collective (EC) is a student-run organization for the promotion of social justice, environmental welfare, and economic security on-campus and beyond. In the past, we have installed water bottle filters, screened documentaries, promoted ecological policies on campus, hosted call-ins for national climate legislation and collaborated with local citizen groups for international days of action. So far this semester we are planning on fixing up previously installed water bottle filters, sending members to Power Shift 2013 and taking action in the Bard College Fossil Fuel campaign. While plans for this semester are strong, they are also flexible and contingent upon the enthusiastic consent, and active engagement of our members. We are always receptive to new faces and ideas, so stop by whenever you can.

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Eco-Reps Biweekly Meeting

Students for Sustainability
Olin, Room 205  Biweekly meetings on September 17, October 1, October 15, October 23, November 6, November 20, December 4, and December 18.

These meetings are held to discuss upcoming Eco-Rep events, related volunteer opportunies, new Eco-Rep manuel passages, concerns about recycle bins in dorms and other Eco-Rep related activities. 

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Environmental Debt: The Hidden Costs of a Changing Global Economy

A talk by Amy Larkin--award-winning environmental activist, business advisor for Greenpeace International, and former director of Greenpeace Solutions
Reem-Kayden Center  “For anyone interested in environmental and economic policy, this is a fascinating, provocative book. Brisk, bold, and blunt, Larkin is a devastating critic of current business practices, but she wants to inspire, not scold.”

Is corporate America ready for some tough love from Greenpeace? Award-winning environmental activist Larkin, business advisor for Greenpeace International, and former director of Greenpeace Solutions, wants to connect business profitability with the survival of the natural world rather than its destruction. For anyone interested in environmental and economic policy, this is a fascinating, provocative book. Brisk, bold, and blunt, Larkin is a devastating critic of current business practices, but she wants to inspire, not scold. Her profiles in corporate courage include Unilever, which lobbies for stronger government regulation, and Puma, the “[first multinational] to create an integrated report that converted environmental [data] into monetary terms,” as well as some unlikely heroes, such as McDonald’s, Wal-Mart, and former California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, who inspired the California Solar Initiative with his call for the creation of a million solar roofs in the state by 2016. Some good news: renewable energy is a true job creator. The ultimate renewable energy source Larkin celebrates is the power of thoughtful people with a common goal. In the words of McDonald’s vice-president for corporate responsibility, “Odd couples can add out-of-the-box thinking that leads to innovative win-win scenarios.” Agent: Laura Yorke, Carol Mann Agency. (June)

Retrieved from: http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1-137-27855-5

See her articles:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amy-larkin/clean-energy-technology_b_2759802.html
OR
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amy-larkin/post_4514_b_2883616.html


Friday, November 1, 2013

Teaching the Sustainability Imperative in Any Class

A workshop for professors in EUS and beyond
Calling all chemists, philosophers, economists, artists, mathematicians, anthropologists and everyone in between. 
Here is a chance for EUS faculty and staff to work alongside local, regional, and national experts in higher education addressing sustainabilility.

Please join us, here on Bard Campus, Friday November 1st, from noon to five for a panel and workshop on sustainability in the classroom. The afternoon workshop will be lead by Dr. Pushpa Ramakrishna. Ramakrishna has been a leader in helping faculty from all disciplines learn to teach effectively about sustainability, helping drive widespread faculty engagement throughout her home institution, the Maricopa Community College system in Phoenix, one of the largest educational institutions in the country. 

Noon-1 Panel: The workshop will be proceeded by a panel on sustainability and civic engagement, with Dr. Ramakrishna, and Bard's very own Sustainability Manager Laurie Husted and Dean of Civic Engagement Erin Canaan, and moderated by Bard CEP Director, Eban Goodstein. What are best practices for designing internships and practica that can help students become sustainability leaders? There is no charge for the workshop. To register, please e-mail Josephine French at jofrench@bard.edu.

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Community Dinner at Feitler House

Feitler Co-op vegetarian community dinner, all welcome!
Feitler House  Feitler House neighborhood is a student-run vegetarian cooperative, housing 10 Upper College students. Residents share responsibility for all cleaning and meal preparation, and make decisions by consensus. Admission to the co-op is by application from Upper College students only.

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Environmental Collective


Root Cellar  The Environmental Collective (EC) is a student-run organization for the promotion of social justice, environmental welfare, and economic security on-campus and beyond. In the past, we have installed water bottle filters, screened documentaries, promoted ecological policies on campus, hosted call-ins for national climate legislation and collaborated with local citizen groups for international days of action. So far this semester we are planning on fixing up previously installed water bottle filters, sending members to Power Shift 2013 and taking action in the Bard College Fossil Fuel campaign. While plans for this semester are strong, they are also flexible and contingent upon the enthusiastic consent, and active engagement of our members. We are always receptive to new faces and ideas, so stop by whenever you can.

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

EUS Internship Presentations

Or, how to save the earth in 15 minutes or less!
Olin, Room 204  EUS students complete a real-world, hands-on internship before they graduate. This Wednesday, October 30th, from 5-8 PM, upperclassmen will pass the torch on to the next generation of EUS majors and talk about what made their internships great (or not so great). These presentations will be short, fun, and there will be snacks!

Saturday, October 26, 2013

Farmers Market at Reem-Kayden Center

Local items for you and your family
Reem-Kayden Center  Bard Farm
Good Flavor Farm
Plate Clove Naturals
Cats' View Farm
Migliorelli Farm
Montgomery Place Orchards
Shoving Leopard Farm

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Community Dinner at Feitler House

Feitler Co-op vegetarian community dinner, all welcome!
Feitler House  Feitler House neighborhood is a student-run vegetarian cooperative, housing 10 Upper College students. Residents share responsibility for all cleaning and meal preparation, and make decisions by consensus. Admission to the co-op is by application from Upper College students only.

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Environmental Collective


Root Cellar  The Environmental Collective (EC) is a student-run organization for the promotion of social justice, environmental welfare, and economic security on-campus and beyond. In the past, we have installed water bottle filters, screened documentaries, promoted ecological policies on campus, hosted call-ins for national climate legislation and collaborated with local citizen groups for international days of action. So far this semester we are planning on fixing up previously installed water bottle filters, sending members to Power Shift 2013 and taking action in the Bard College Fossil Fuel campaign. While plans for this semester are strong, they are also flexible and contingent upon the enthusiastic consent, and active engagement of our members. We are always receptive to new faces and ideas, so stop by whenever you can.

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Digital Faulkner


Olin, Room 204  Presented by Julie Beth Napolin

This talk addresses the speculative territory of digital cartography as it is remapping our literary encounters. Julie Beth Napolin describes how the UVa "Digital Yoknapatawpha" project is addressing the theoretical and practical challenges of transforming Faulkner's ambiguous narratives into data, and then visualizing that data in a map and other displays.

Julie Beth Napolin is Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities at Eugene Lang College, The New School for Liberal Arts. Her book in progress, The Acoustics of Narrative Involvement, places the work of Faulkner within the soundscape of global modernism, beginning with the phonograph and ending with new media aesthetics. She's published her work in Qui Parle and the edited volumes Vibratory Modernism and Fifty Years After Faulkner. Her essay on sound and vibration in Conrad was awarded the 2013 Bruce Harkness prize by the Joseph Conrad Society of America. She is currently Associate Director of Digital Yoknapatawpha, an online map of the world of Faulkner, and Associate Editor of the site's rendering of The Sound and the Fury.

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Eco-Reps Biweekly Meeting

Students for Sustainability
Olin, Room 205  Biweekly meetings on September 17, October 1, October 15, October 23, November 6, November 20, December 4, and December 18.

These meetings are held to discuss upcoming Eco-Rep events, related volunteer opportunies, new Eco-Rep manuel passages, concerns about recycle bins in dorms and other Eco-Rep related activities. 

Saturday, October 19, 2013

New Orleans Exchange Raffle Drawing

A Fundraiser to Benefit the New Orleans Exchange
Bard Hall, Bard College Campus  BNOE has been tabling in the Campus Center so that you can win:

DINNER FOR TWO AT GIGI'S

FREE PASSES TO UPSTATE FILMS

FREE FOOD FROM J&J'S

Don't you want to know if you won?

Stop by, eat some homemade goodies, and listen to music by:

Hari and the Karis
Big Daddy's Second Line (Samba School ensemble)
Whiskey Before Breakfast 
and more!





Thursday, October 17, 2013

Community Dinner at Feitler House

Feitler Co-op vegetarian community dinner, all welcome!
Feitler House  Feitler House neighborhood is a student-run vegetarian cooperative, housing 10 Upper College students. Residents share responsibility for all cleaning and meal preparation, and make decisions by consensus. Admission to the co-op is by application from Upper College students only.

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Environmental Collective


Root Cellar  The Environmental Collective (EC) is a student-run organization for the promotion of social justice, environmental welfare, and economic security on-campus and beyond. In the past, we have installed water bottle filters, screened documentaries, promoted ecological policies on campus, hosted call-ins for national climate legislation and collaborated with local citizen groups for international days of action. So far this semester we are planning on fixing up previously installed water bottle filters, sending members to Power Shift 2013 and taking action in the Bard College Fossil Fuel campaign. While plans for this semester are strong, they are also flexible and contingent upon the enthusiastic consent, and active engagement of our members. We are always receptive to new faces and ideas, so stop by whenever you can.

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Eco-Reps Biweekly Meeting

Students for Sustainability
Campus Center, Meeting Room 214  Biweekly meetings on September 17, October 1, October 15, October 29, November 12, November 26, December 10, and December 24.

These meetings are held to discuss upcoming Eco-Rep events, related volunteer opportunies, new Eco-Rep manuel passages, concerns about recycle bins in dorms and other Eco-Rep related activities. 

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Webinar: Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Join and receive application fee waiver!
Online  Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds admission webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA and CEP programs. 

What will be covered?
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Details on attending a webinar...
No registration is required. To join simply click on the webinar link 5 minutes before the date and time of the webinar you wish to attend, and enter your Full Name as a "guest" (only your first name will be displayed). A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. A high speed internet connection and phone are required. Phone calls are toll free. (International students must contact us to get details on dialing into the webinar.)

Webinar Link: http://bard.adobeconnect.com/gpswebinar/

Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability

Dual Degree Options Include:

MS/JD with Pace Law School
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability

Peace Corps Programs Include:

Master's International (before you serve)
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)

Friday, October 11, 2013

Environmental Art Lecture: Eve Mosher: "The High Water Line" and other projects

Artist Eve Mosher talks about her eye-opening public art
Fisher Studio Arts Building - Seminar Room  Eve Mosher is an artist and interventionist living and working in New York City. Her works use investigations of the landscape as starting points for audience exploration of urban issues. Her public works raise issues of involvement in the environment, public/private space use, history of place, cultural and social issues and our own understanding of the urban ecosystem. Her work has been profiled in international media including the The New Yorker, New York Times, ARTnews, L’uomo Vogue, and Le Monde. Her public and community based artworks have received grants from New York State Council on the Arts and New York Department of Cultural Affairs, both through the Brooklyn Arts Council, The Compton Foundation, Invoking the Pause and The City Parks Foundation. She has an undergraduate degree in architecture and a Masters in Fine Arts and is currently an assistant professor at Parsons the New School for Design on the advisory team for Schuylkill Center Environmental Art Department and a consultant/leader for the Professional Development Program at Creative Capital.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Community Dinner at Feitler House

Feitler Co-op vegetarian community dinner, all welcome!
Feitler House  Feitler House neighborhood is a student-run vegetarian cooperative, housing 10 Upper College students. Residents share responsibility for all cleaning and meal preparation, and make decisions by consensus. Admission to the co-op is by application from Upper College students only.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Webinar: Graduate Programs in Sustainability

Join and receive application fee waiver!
Online  Bard Graduate Programs in Sustainability holds admission webinars for prospective students to learn more about graduate school options in our MBA and CEP programs. 

What will be covered?
Webinars include a program overview for the Bard MBA in Sustainability and the Bard Center for Environmental Policy programs as well as detailed admissions information, course requirements, tips to make your application strong, and financial information. 

Details on attending a webinar...
No registration is required. To join simply click on the webinar link 5 minutes before the date and time of the webinar you wish to attend, and enter your Full Name as a "guest" (only your first name will be displayed). A $65 application fee waiver is available to those who participate in the webinar at the end of the session. A high speed internet connection and phone are required. Phone calls are toll free.

Webinar Link: http://bard.adobeconnect.com/gpswebinar/

Degree Options Include:
MS in Environmental Policy
MS in Climate Science and Policy
MBA in Sustainability

Dual Degree Options Include:

MS/JD with Pace Law School
MS/MAT with Bard's Master of Arts in Teaching
MS/MBA with Bard's MBA in Sustainability

Peace Corps Programs Include:

Master's International (before you serve)
Peace Corps Fellows (after you serve)

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Environmental Collective


Root Cellar  The Environmental Collective (EC) is a student-run organization for the promotion of social justice, environmental welfare, and economic security on-campus and beyond. In the past, we have installed water bottle filters, screened documentaries, promoted ecological policies on campus, hosted call-ins for national climate legislation and collaborated with local citizen groups for international days of action. So far this semester we are planning on fixing up previously installed water bottle filters, sending members to Power Shift 2013 and taking action in the Bard College Fossil Fuel campaign. While plans for this semester are strong, they are also flexible and contingent upon the enthusiastic consent, and active engagement of our members. We are always receptive to new faces and ideas, so stop by whenever you can.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Day in the Life of the Hudson River

One Day. One Hudson. Hundreds of citizen scientists. Bardians in Canoes.
Bard College Field Station  In the last 10 years we have engaged over 20,000 participants in our Day in the Life events, bringing students, teachers and educators to the Hudson River for sampling, learning and fun! Check our 2012 webpage for results or look over data from earlier years, and for activity sheets from the event!

'DAY IN THE LIFE OF THE HUDSON RIVER' INFORMATION

The event is designed to celebrate the Hudson River Estuary and educate participants on the uniqueness of our estuary as part of the annual recognition of "National Estuaries Week". The event is coordinated by The Hudson River Estuary Program of New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Each fall, environmental education centers are encouraged to team with school classes along the Hudson River to create a day-in-the-life picture of the river from the Troy Dam to New York Harbor.

The event began in 2003 with a modest 300 plus student participants and has grown until in our most recent event, October 2012, we involved over 3765 students and individual participants almost 70 sites from the New York Bight up to Lock 5 in the Hudson River, and into the Mohawk watershed, a major Hudson River tributary. Each site gathers data on the Hudson and shares their results, gaining a better understanding of this historic and vital estuary system. Data, Lesson Plans, Resources...lots of resource materials are provided here for your use in joining us on a virtual exploration of the river...and plan to join us on in 2013 for your own dip in the Hudson River as part of our Day in the Life on the Hudson River!


Wednesday, October 9, 2013 – Saturday, October 19, 2013

New Orleans Exchange Fall Raffle

A Fundraiser to Benefit the New Orleans Exchange
Campus Center, Lobby  Would you be interested in....

Free movies at Upstate Films?

Dinner for two at Gigi's in Rhinebeck?

Free breakfast or lunch at J&J's?


We thought you would. 

Come support the efforts of the New Orleans Exchange by donating to win great prizes from local vendors! We will be tabling in the Campus Center until the 19th with the final drawing that night! You don't want to miss this great opportunity!

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Bard College Fossil Fuel Divestment Campaign Workshop

350.org Liaison KC Alvey will be teaching about administrative negotiations, campaign demands, organizational goals, and recruitment
Olin, Room 201  The Environment Collective and the Socially Responsible Investment Collective are hosting the speaker KC Alvey.

KC Alvey is a representative from 350.org (http://350.org/our-team), a website dedicated to building a global grassroots movement to solve the climate crisis. She has been in communication with the Bard College Fossil Fuel Divestment Campaign since it's beginnings and is in contact with many other college campaign groups all over the northeast (Vassar and Hamilton to name a few). 

Alvey will be teaching about administrative negotiations, campaign demands, organizational goals, recruitment and such using the BCFFDC as point of discussion. All campaign activists are welcome, as I'm sure her insights will applicable to other campaigns.


Wednesday, October 2, 2013

To Hunt Seals: The Modern Alaska Native Sea Otter Fur Trade

Meet a Native Alaskan who hunts Protected Species of Marine Mammals
Preston 110 
Yup'ik marine mammal hunter and skin sewer Peter Williams will speak on spiritual and sustainable relationships with nature.

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Eco-Reps Biweekly Meeting

Students for Sustainability
Campus Center, Meeting Room 214  Biweekly meetings on September 17, October 1, October 15, October 29, November 12, November 26, December 10, and December 24.

These meetings are held to discuss upcoming Eco-Rep events, related volunteer opportunies, new Eco-Rep manuel passages, concerns about recycle bins in dorms and other Eco-Rep related activities. 

Friday, September 27, 2013

Thinking Like A River (student presentations)


Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Friday 4-5PM: Bard student presentations: Gleb Mikhalev will show films he created of salmon on our western rivers, Christina Baal will share paintings of the natural life of the Hudson River and Bard CEP student Ashely Brinkman will discuss her work with the EPA on the Ohio River. 


Friday, September 27, 2013

Thinking Like a River

A Conversation between Science and Poetry
Reem-Kayden Center Room 102  Join poets and scientists as they discuss their work and the intersection of poetry and science. Speakers include poet and essayist John Lane, Director of the Glendale Shoals Environmental Center at Wofford College, John Cronin, Hudson River activist and other artists, naturalists, and river poets for an interdisciplinary conversation. See the EUS website for updates and more information: eus.bard.edu.

Friday, September 27, 2013

Thinking Like A River (guest presentations)


Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Friday Sept. 27 at 2 in RKC 103 Think Like a River with John Lane, Wofford College; John Cronin, activist and professor at Pace University and Clarkson University; Liz Bradfield, founder of Broadsided Press, naturalist, and Jacob Ziskind Visiting Poet-in-residence at Brandeis University; and Emma Rosi-Marshall, acquatic ecologist at the Cary Institute. 

After a short break with refreshments students will present their work. Gleb Mikhalev will show films he created of salmon on our western rivers, Christina Baal will share paintings of the natural life of the Hudson River and Bard CEP student Ashely Brinkman will discuss her work with the EPA on the Ohio River.


Thursday, September 26, 2013

Thinking Like A River (opening night)


Bard Hall, Bard College Campus 

Following on Wofford College’s successful Fall 2012 Thinking Like a River Conference, Thinking Like a River moves north—to Bard College. John Lane—poet, naturalist, southern nature writer and river rat—launched the first Thinking Like a River weekend and he will be on campus to lead discussions and canoe outings over the course of the weekend. With him will be poets, writers, activists, naturalists and river lovers discussing rivers in an interdisciplinary manner. 

The weekend will kick off on Thursday September 26 at 6 in Bard Hall with music, poems and local food!  Bard graduate Chris Rubeo will sing river songs in the tradition of Pete Seeger and Betty and the Baby Boomers and talk about his environmental work. Art from Lisa Sanditz’s art class will grace the walls along with photographs from Tim Davis’s color photography class.  Guests John Lane and Elizabeth Bradfield will read poems and they will be joined by Bard College faculty Celia Bland and Phil Pardi. Come think about rivers and learn more about Bard’s Environmental and Urban Studies Program.


Thursday, September 26, 2013

EUS Open House!

A fun and stimulating time for students interested or moderated in Environmental and Urban Studies
Bard Hall, Bard College Campus  On Thursday September 26 at 6 EUS will hold our open house in Bard Hall. The open house will coincide with the opening of the Thinking Like A River conference, and will include music, poems and local food!

Bard graduate Chris Rubeo will sing river songs in the tradition of Pete Seeger and Betty and the Baby Boomers and talk about his environmental work. Art from Lisa Sanditz’s art class will grace the walls along with photographs from Tim Davis’s color photography class.  Guests John Lane and Elizabeth Bradfield will read poems and they will be joined by Bard College faculty Celia Bland and Phil Pardi. Come think about rivers and learn more about Bard’s Environmental and Urban Studies Program.

This event (and the entire Thinking Like a River weekend) is made possible by a Bard Mellon-Supported Faculty-Student Collaborative Research award.


Monday, September 23, 2013

SolarBowl

at the volunteer fair
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  We’re building a movement to help every homeowner adopt clean affordable solar energy, one rooftop at a time. Come to the Volunteer Fair and sign up for SolarBowl, six week solar homeowner education contest starting 10/1. Can’t make the Fair? Come to the training session 9/25 President’s Room in Kline, or email reduce@bard.edu

Monday, September 23, 2013

CCE Volunteer Fair and Farmers Market


Campus Center, Lobby 

Hudson Valley community agencies, community services, governmental agencies, libraries and non-profits will be recruiting volunteers from the Northern Dutchess and Ulster County region. For more information go to http://blogs.bard.edu/civicengagement/?page_id=1142.

 

The Volunteer Fair provides an opportunity for community agencies to connect with interested volunteers and represents services for: children and adolescence, culture and the arts, families, historic preservation, housing, literacy, medical emergencies, mental health, senior citizens, and sustainability.  Over 50 organizations plan on attending including: Community Big Read, Habitat for Humanity, Hospice, Make a Wish Foundation, NY Sheep and Wool Festival O+ Festival, Panda23, Red Cross, Rotary, Statesburgh State Historic Sites, and Ulstercorps.

 

“Like an internship, volunteering gives you real world work experience and helps in resume building,” says fair coordinator Erin Cannan. “But a volunteer also gains a more personal connection to the community. It’s a great way to help our local organizations increase their capacity and harness resources in the local community.”

 

Sponsors for this event include: Bard Center for Civic Engagement, Red Hook Central School District, Red Hook Chamber of Commerce, Red Hook Library, Red Hook Village Hall, Kingston Mayor’s Office and Red Hook Together.

 

For questions contact Associate Director for the Center for Civic Engagement Erin Cannan at cannan@bard.edu or 758-7453.


Sunday, September 22, 2013

Meet and greet Bard CEP Students and Alumni/ae in Washington D.C.

Attention future environmental leaders!


Busboys and Poets, 5th and K, Washington DC 

The Bard Center for Environmental Policy, located in the Hudson Valley of New York, offers master of science degrees for people who will change the world. Join us and make your career dreams a reality.

Meet and Greet at Busboys and Poets on 5th and K in Washington D.C. for future environmental graduate students. Full menu is available, light appetizers will be served. No registration required!

ADDRESS
1025 5th Street NW
Washington, DC 20001


Saturday, September 21, 2013 – Sunday, September 22, 2013

Bard Farm Harvest Fest 2013

Come celebrate the second season of the Bard Farm and the amazing harvest this year!
Manor/Farm Lawn (Rain Location - Manor)  We're also unleashing the first ever "Bard Brew", a beer made by Crossroads Brewery with 31 lbs of hops grown right here on the Bard Farm!

Bands begin at 4:30pm and play until the clock strikes midnight!! Food Starts @ 5pm and goes until 11pm

MENU
- Burgers (local grass fed beef)
- Bard Farm Green Bean Fries
- Coleslaw and Local Pork Tacos (or Vegetarian option)
- Bard Farm Dill Pickles

BARD BREW (a.k.a, "Hop-Monster" a Black IPA) will be sold on draft!!! PLEASE BRING YOUR ID

MUSIC LINEUP 

5.00 PM - Moonjelly
(https://soundcloud.com/moonjellyfish)

5.30 PM - Maxy & the Beefcakes 

6.00 PM - Morus Alba
(http://morusalba.bandcamp.com/)

6.30 PM Huckleberry Binge (http://huckleberrybinge.bandcamp.com/)

7.00 PM - Shana Falana (http://shanafalana.bandcamp.com/)

7.45 PM - Dr. Skinnybones
(http://drskinnybones.bandcamp.com/)

8.15 PM - Hari and the Karis 
(http://hariandthekaris.bandcamp.com/)

8.50 PM - O-Face (http://o-face.bandcamp.com/)

9.25 PM - Wave Envy
(http://waveenvy.bandcamp.com/)

10.00 PM - The Great American Novel
(http://thegreatamericannovel.bandcamp.com/)

10.45 PM - PORCHES.
(http://porchesmusic.bandcamp.com/)

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Eco-Reps Biweekly Meeting

Students for Sustainability
Campus Center, Meeting Room 214  Biweekly meetings on September 17, October 1, October 15, October 29, November 12, November 26, December 10, and December 24.

These meetings are held to discuss upcoming Eco-Rep events, related volunteer opportunies, new Eco-Rep manuel passages, concerns about recycle bins in dorms and other Eco-Rep related activities. 

Friday, August 30, 2013

3rd Annual Bard CEP Alumni/ae Panel


Ward Manor  Join us Friday, August 30th from 10am - 12pm in Manor House for a conversation with CEP alumni/ae on environmental policy careers and life in the professional realm. Members of the CEP community are encouraged to attend.

Alumni/ae Panelists Include:

Christine DeBoer
Executive Director, Wallkill Valley Land Trust

Dan J. Smith
Energy Efficiency Coordinator, Office of Sustainability, Bard College

Jessica LeClair
Environmental Analyst, Office of Climate Change and Innovation, Bureau of Energy and Technology Policy, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

Vanessa Arcara
Executive Assistant to Bill McKibben, 350.org

Friday, August 23, 2013

Can Gross National Happiness Guide the Global Economy


Olin Language Center, Room 115  Join us for an evening lecture with sustainability expert and Bard MBA Faculty, Hunter Lovins. Lovins will discuss her work with the government of Bhutan and the UN to develop a new roadmap for global economic sustainability. Please join her for a progress report. All are welcome to attend. 


Hunter Lovins, Bard MBA Faculty; President of Natural Capitalism, Inc.
Hunter Lovins J.D., Loyola Law School; B.S. (Sociology, Political Science). L. Hunter Lovins is president and founder of Natural Capitalism Solutions (NCS). NCS educates senior decision makers in business, government, and civil society to restore and enhance natural and human capital while increasing prosperity and quality of life. Lovins is also currently a faculty member at Bainbridge Graduate Institute and the chief insurgent of the Madrone Project. Lovins has consulted for scores of industries, governments, and large and small companies worldwide. Recipient of such honors as the Right Livelihood Award, Lindbergh Award, and Leadership in Business, she was named Time Magazine 2000 Hero of the Planet and in 2009 Newsweek dubbed her a “Green Business Icon.” She has co-authored nine books and hundreds of papers, including the 1999 book Natural Capitalism, 2006 e-book Climate Protection Manual for Cities, and the 2009 book Transforming Industry in Asia. She has served on the boards of governments, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit companies. Lovins’s areas of expertise include natural capitalism, sustainable development, globalization, energy and resource policy, economic development, climate change, land management, fire rescue, and emergency medicine. She developed the Economic Renewal Project and helped write many of its manuals on sustainable community economic development. She was a founding professor of business at Presidio Graduate School, one of the first accredited programs offering an M.B.A. in sustainable management.


Thursday, June 20, 2013

Bike Co-op Open Hours


Bike Co-op (beneath Old Gym, entrance by S. Hall)  Need help fixing your bike? We will teach you how, as well as provide all tools/parts, even to build your own bike from scratch. No experience needed.

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Bike Co-op Open Hours


Bike Co-op (beneath Old Gym, entrance by S. Hall)  Need help fixing your bike? We will teach you how, as well as provide all tools/parts, even to build your own bike from scratch. No experience needed.

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Bike Co-op Open Hours


Bike Co-op (beneath Old Gym, entrance by S. Hall)  Need help fixing your bike? We will teach you how, as well as provide all tools/parts, even to build your own bike from scratch. No experience needed.

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Bike Co-op Open Hours


Bike Co-op (beneath Old Gym, entrance by S. Hall)  Need help fixing your bike? We will teach you how, as well as provide all tools/parts, even to build your own bike from scratch. No experience needed.

Thursday, June 6, 2013

Bike Co-op Open Hours


Bike Co-op (beneath Old Gym, entrance by S. Hall)  Need help fixing your bike? We will teach you how, as well as provide all tools/parts, even to build your own bike from scratch. No experience needed.

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

Bike Co-op Open Hours


Bike Co-op (beneath Old Gym, entrance by S. Hall)  Need help fixing your bike? We will teach you how, as well as provide all tools/parts, even to build your own bike from scratch. No experience needed.

Friday, May 17, 2013

Bike to Bard for National Bike Month

join an organized ride or plan your own
Bicycle  Meet at Taste Budd's Chocolate & Coffee Cafe between 8:00 and 8:30am; we will depart for Bard on the 'safer' route at 8:30am.  Friday bikers: TEXT 'ibike' to 845-538-4055 and get a free small coffee before the ride.  Offer good for all Bard bikers till 11am.

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Spatial Analysis and Mapping: Poster Session and Guest Speaker


Bertelsmann Campus Center 

1pm in Weis: Benjamin H. Houston, P.E., PMP, GISP
2pm in MPR: Student Poster Presentations and Reception

The Bard Center for Environmental Policy invites you to a special presentation on Spatial Analysis and Mapping. Students from Bard CEP master’s program will be presenting posters illustrating final projects they completed for this semesters GIS: Tools for Analysis class. The event will also feature special guest speaker, Benjamin Houston of GroundPoint Technologies. Lite refreshments served!

Special Guest Speaker

Benjamin H. Houston, P.E., PMP, GISP

Chief Executive Officer

GroundPoint Technologies

Mr. Houston has 20 years experience in topographic engineering and related engineering and mapping activities. He is co-founder of GroundPoint Technologies currently leads business development and strategic planning. He has a Bachelor of Science in Geological Engineering from Colorado School of Mines and a Master of Science in Earth Science from North Carolina State University.

Mr. Houston spent 12 years as an Army Officer, first as a Topographic Engineer in the US Army Corps of Engineers and later as a Staff Officer, Public Health Engineer, and Special Operations Team Leader with the US Army Special Operations Command. He is a graduate of the US Army Combined Arms Services Staff School, the Defense Mapping Agency, and the JFK Special Warfare Center and School. Mr. Houston has also held various positions as an engineer and GIS analyst with both for-profit and non-profit consulting companies, and has held positions in various local government agencies at the County level including the Department of Planning, Department of Public Works, and the Department of Health. He is a licensed Professional Engineer in the State of New York and has a broad background in public health engineering, public utilities infrastructure, and stormwater management. Mr. Houston specializes in raster based terrain analysis and GIS data integration. He is a certified Project Management Professional by the Project Management Institute (PMI) and a certified GIS Professional by the GIS Certification Institute (GISCI). He is a past Vice-President of the Genesee/Finger Lakes Region Geographic Information System Special Interest Group, and is currently an active member of the New York State GIS Association, the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS), and the American Water Resources Association (AWRA). 

Mr. Houston’s background enables him to uniquely understand local government user needs, and how to successfully apply advanced terrain mapping and GIS technologies to achieve project success.


Tuesday, May 14, 2013

EUS Colloquium: Nate Gabriel


Olin, Room 102  Nate Gabriel will discuss environmentalism in the context of political ecology, post-structuralism, and post-humanism, which in his view have together helped to theorize the environment not as a realm that is by its essential nature separate from human beings, ut one that becomes so through the ways we come to know and interact with the non-human world.

His talk will draw from his recent PhD research on urban parks to explore the disciplinary nature of "the urban environment" and the kinds of people it has led us to become. He will explore the ways urban park management, as a disciplinary frame, expresses itself far beyond the confines of the park, and informs larger public debates about the appropriate forms of urban development and the relationship between urban people and the natural world. He will conclude with a discussion of what post-structuralism and post-humanism mean for an environmental ethic, and how we might use this understanding to forge new kinds of relationships with the world around us.

Friday, May 10, 2013

EUS Film Series

A Screening and Discussion
Preston  "Americans generally like to hear good news. They like to believe that a new president will right old wrongs, that clean energy will replace dirty oil and that fresh thinking will set the economy straight. American pundits tend to restrain their pessimism and hope for the best. But is anyone prepared for the worst?

Meet Michael Ruppert, a different kind of American. A former Los Angeles police officer turned independent reporter, he predicted the current financial crisis in his self-published newsletter, From the Wilderness, at a time when most Wall Street and Washington analysts were still in denial. Director Chris Smith has shown an affinity for outsiders in films like American Movie and The Yes Men. In Collapse, he departs stylistically from his past documentaries by interviewing Ruppert in a format that recalls the work of Errol Morris and Spalding Gray.

Sitting in a room that looks like a bunker, Ruppert recounts his career as a radical thinker and spells out the crises he sees ahead. He draws upon the same news reports and data available to any Internet user, but he applies a unique interpretation. He is especially passionate about the issue of peak oil, the concern raised by scientists since the seventies that the world will eventually run out of fossil fuel. While other experts debate this issue in measured tones, Ruppert doesn't hold back at sounding an alarm, portraying an apocalyptic future. Listening to his rapid flow of opinions, the viewer is likely to question some of the rhetoric as paranoid or deluded, and to sway back and forth on what to make of the extremism. Smith lets viewers form their own judgments.

Collapse also serves as a portrait of a loner. Over the years, Ruppert has stood up for what he believes in despite fierce opposition. He candidly describes the sacrifices and motivators in his life. While other observers analyze details of the economic crisis, Ruppert views it as symptomatic of nothing less than the collapse of industrial civilization itself."

http://www.collapsemovie.com/


Tuesday, May 7, 2013

EUS Colloquium: Akiko Busch and Doug Reed.


Olin, Room 102  Akiko Busch has written about design and culture since 1979. She is the author of Geography of Home: Writings on Where We Live, The Uncommon Life of Common Objects: Essays on Design and the Everyday, and Nine Ways to Cross a River, a collection of essays about swimming across American Rivers. Her most recent book is The Incidental Steward: Reflections on Citizen Science in which she contemplates our changing natural world and the value of stewardship. She will be joined by environmentalist Doug Reed, as they discuss his work measuring submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) at the Stockport Flats.

Monday, May 6, 2013

Art History/EUS Information Session


Kline, Faculty Dining Room  Come learn about Fall '13 course offerings
and new faculty members.


Refreshments will be served.


Sunday, April 28, 2013

Plant Walk With Herbalist Dina Falconi


Community Garden  Herbalist Dina Falconi will be taking us on a walk starting at the Bard Community Garden and ending at the Bard Farm. She will share with us medicinal plants along the way and how we can use them. 

Friday, April 26, 2013

Infusing Herbs


Feitler House 

This Friday at Feitler Coop  from 4pm to 6pm Herbalist Ustya Tarnawsky will be teaching us about infusing herbs into our life, which will cover the use of different menstrums (water, vinegar, alcohol, honey and oil), how to infuse them and what to do with these infusions. We will make a batch of cream and learn about making balms and salves. We will be serving a homemade herbal tea so if you can please bring a cup that would be super appreciated. We will also walk around the yard and identify spring edibles. 

Friday, April 26, 2013

EUS Film Series

A Screening and Discussion
Preston 

"The largest domestic natural gas drilling boom in history has swept across the United States. The Halliburton-developed drilling technology of 'fracking' or hydraulic fracturing has unlocked a 'Saudia Arabia of natural gas' just beneath us. But is fracking safe? When filmmaker Josh Fox is asked to lease his land for drilling, he embarks on a cross-country odyssey uncovering a trail of secrets, lies and contamination. A recently drilled nearby Pennsylvania town reports that residents are able to light their drinking water on fire. This is just one of the many absurd and astonishing revelations of a new country called GASLAND. Part verite travelogue, part expose, part mystery, part bluegrass banjo meltdown, part showdown."

http://www.gaslandthemovie.com/


Thursday, April 25, 2013

Permaculture for Home and Garden

Discussing organic gardening, building with local natural materials, ecological lawn, meadow, stream and wetland care, orchards, composting and more

Community Garden 
This Thursday we have a special guest, Permaculturist Andrew Faust coming to share his knowledge in the community garden from 3-6. 

He will be talking about Permaculture for Home and Garden. In this workshop, we will learn Permaculture principles as applied in temperate homes and gardens. We will discuss organic gardening, building with local natural materials, ecological lawn, meadow, stream and wetland care, orchards, composting, off-the-grid water systems, and domestic and wild animal management.

Bring questions about your garden and home and be prepared to learn about ideas that can improve your quality of life, simplify your needs, and increase your family time by cooperating with ecological processes to create abundance and diversity. 

For more information check out his website, www.homebiome.com 

Here is a link to a youtube video so you can familiarize yourself with his work before he comes.  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivd_BqKtDzY&list=UUNDARIeBD6aPnxaBW5YxLpQ&index=13  

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

EUS Colloquium: Mark Castiglione, Executive Director of the Hudson River Valley Greenway.


Olin, Room 102  Castiglione will provide an overview of the Hudson River Greenway, which began with a Staet Act in 1991. The Greenway Act created a process for voluntary regional cooperation among 264 communities within 13 counties that border the Hudson River. The Greenway reveals the state's commitment to the preservation, enhancement and development of the scenic, natural, historic, cultural and recreational resrouces of the Hudson River Valley while continuing to emphasize economic development activities and remaining consistent with the tradition of municipal home rule. Castiglione will discuss the policy framework for such an ambitious project and tell some success stories. He will also discuss what works to move people to action.

Friday, April 19, 2013

EUS Film Series

A Screening and Discussion
Preston  "What's the true price of that banana you're eating? One third of the production cost of the average banana goes to pesticides. All over the world, banana plantation workers are being adversely affected from the effects of these pesticides."

"Juan 'Accidentes' Dominguez is on his biggest case ever. On behalf of twelve Nicaraguan banana workers he is tackling Dole Food in a ground-breaking legal battle for their use of a banned pesticide that was known by the company to cause sterility. Can he beat the giant, or will the corporation get away with it? In the suspenseful documentary BANANAS!*, filmmaker Fredrik Gertten sheds new light on the global politics of food."


Thursday, April 18, 2013

Energy Efficiency Improvements at the Kingston Library: A Presentation of Results


Albee B102  A team of students at the Bard Center for Environmental Policy (Lauren Frisch, Rochelle March, and Kyle Rorah) led by Professor Gautam Sethi has conducted an analysis of the impact of energy efficiency improvements made by the Kingston Library over the period 2005-2012. They will present their findings at this seminar and brainstorm with the audience about some results that are peculiar and hard to explain.

Please join us! 



Wednesday, April 17, 2013

A National Conversation on Democracy and Climate

Presented by C2C Fellows
Olin Hall 

C2C Fellows and Bard CEP will host a national screening of the documentary film "The Island President" on Wednesday evening, April 17th at 7pm. Director Jon Shenk’s The Island President is the story of President Mohamed Nasheed of the Maldives, a man confronting a problem greater than any other world leader has ever faced—the survival of his country and his people. After bringing democracy to the Maldives after thirty years of despotic rule, Nasheed is now faced with an even greater challenge: as one of the most low-lying countries in the world, a rise of three feet in sea level would submerge the 1200 islands of the Maldives enough to make them uninhabitable. 

Following the screening at 9:00pm EST we will be joined by the award winning director, Jon Shenk, along with former UN Deputy Permanent Representative to the Maldives, Thilmeeza Hussain, and also Executive Director and Co-Founder of 350.org, May Boeve, to discuss with a national audience the urgency of action on climate change from an international perspective.

Please join us, and more than 100 campuses around the country, in the Olin Hall. All are welcome.


Tuesday, April 16, 2013

EUS Colloquium: Begaiym Esenkulov, Assistant Professor of law in the American University of Central Asia, Kyrgyzstan.


Olin, Room 102  Professor Esenkulov is a Ph.D. candidate in Central European University, Hungary. She will be presenting a part of her doctoral work on the legal regulation of foreign direct investment (FDI) and sustainable development in extractive industries in Central Asia.

The presentation will be concentrated upon the legal aspects of FDI and sustainable environmental development in the gold mining sector of the Kyrgyz Republic. Kyrgyzstan, a former Soviet republic of Central Asia, is currently attracting many foreign investors to its gold mining sector. This is a rather positive development. Yet, FDI, if not properly regulated, may cause a number of problems, including environmental harm.

Furthermore, as the resources are non-renewable, Kyrgyzstan has a one-time opportunity to transform the resource wealth into sustainable development. Therefore, the challenge is to have investors engage in their investment operations in a way as to balance their profits and the wider environmental effects of their economic activity.

What international and domestic law instruments may be used in order to balance the rights and obligations of investors in this field? How may the country escape the “resource curse”? The answers to these key questions will be discussed during the presentation.

The proposed recommendations will be made with the aim of helping Kyrgyzstan successfully set on the course of sustainable environmental development in the gold mining field for the sake of present and future generations.

Monday, April 15, 2013

Place, Conservation, and Development in Destination Landscapes

A Lecture by Shaun Golding
Candidate for tenure track position in Environmental and Urban Studies

Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  This talk considers the complex relationship between socio-economic inequality and conservation in America’s rural destinations, by probing the gentrifying effect of urban-rural migration. It derives from qualitative research on land use planning conducted in a rural destination community in the Midwest, and from national demographic research on the process of rural gentrification.  

Shaun Golding is a graduate of Bowdoin College, where he majored in sociology and environmental studies.  He earned his MS in rural sociology and his PhD in sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His areas of emphasis include the environment and natural resources, migration, and social inequality. He is particularly interested in community-based and internationally comparative studies of rural conservation and development.

Friday, April 12, 2013

EUS Film Series

A Screening and Discussion
Preston  "It began as a housing marvel. Two decades later, it ended in rubble. But what happened to those caught in between? The Pruitt-Igoe Myth tells the story of the transformation of the American city in the decades after World War II, through the lens of the infamous Pruitt-Igoe housing development and the St. Louis residents who called it home. At the film’s historical center is an analysis of the massive impact of the national urban renewal program of the 1950s and 1960s, which prompted the process of mass suburbanization and emptied American cities of their residents, businesses, and industries."

http://www.pruitt-igoe.com/

Sunday, April 7, 2013

Cheese/Yogurt Making and Nutrition 


Feitler House  Next Sunday at noon in the Feitler Kitchen, Chrisso from Cody Creek farm is coming to teach us about milk and what you can make with it. 

We will be making cheese and yogurt. Come learn and have a fun time! 

Friday, March 29, 2013

EUS Film Series

A Screening and Discussion
Preston  "DIRT! The Movie–directed and produced by Bill Benenson and Gene Rosow–takes you inside the wonders of the soil. It tells the story of Earth’s most valuable and underappreciated source of fertility–from its miraculous beginning to its crippling degradation.

The opening scenes of the film dive into the wonderment of the soil. Made from the same elements as the stars, plants and animals, and us, 'dirt is very much alive.' Though, in modern industrial pursuits and clamor for both profit and natural resources, our human connection to and respect for soil has been disrupted. 'Drought, climate change, even war are all directly related to the way we are treating dirt.'

DIRT! the Movie–narrated by Jaime Lee Curtis–brings to life the environmental, economic, social and political impact that the soil has. It shares the stories of experts from all over the world who study and are able to harness the beauty and power of a respectful and mutually beneficial relationship with soil."

www.thedirtmovie.org


Wednesday, March 20, 2013

You Are What Your Seafood Eats

Linking Nutrient and Contaminant Patterns in Aquatic Food Webs with Human Health

RKC 102  A lecture by
Roxanne Karimi
Candidate for the science position in Environmental Studies

The consumption of seafood functions as an important link between our environment and our health. Seafood consumption is increasing worldwide, and understanding the risks and benefits of eating different species of fish is critical for human health. Fish from both freshwater and marine environments are primary sources of nutrients, including omega-3 fatty acids and essential trace metals, as well as contaminants, including mercury. This talk will examine how ecological factors influence nutrient and contaminant concentrations in aquatic organisms, and human health through fish consumption.

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Confidential Paper Shredding Day


Campus Center, Lobby  The last week of Recyclemania has arrived and we're going out with a bang with Confidential Paper Shredding Day in the Campus Center. Bring in confidential papers from home to be deposited in a secure bin in the Campus Center so that they can be shredded safely and securely. 

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Human-Dominated Ecosystems: Do Natural Processes Matter?


RKC 111  A Lecture by Steve M. Raciti
, Candidate for the Science Position in Environmental Studies

If current trends continue, the world’s urban population will double and urban land area will quadruple over the next 50 years. A greater knowledge of urban ecosystems will be essential for predicting and mitigating the environmental consequences of this explosive urban growth. My research uses ecology and biogeochemistry to explore the dynamic interactions between ecosystems, global change, and an increasingly urban human population. For instance, are urban areas important for carbon sequestration? How do urban green spaces influence water quality? What is the fate of soils beneath impervious surfaces? Does greater population density lead to greater sustainability? This seminar will address these questions and others related to the role of ecological processes in urban areas.

Friday, March 15, 2013

EUS Film Series Presents Surviving Progress

A Screening and Discussion
Preston  "Ronald Wright, whose best-seller, 'A Short History Of Progress' inspired this film, reveals how civilizations are repeatedly destroyed by 'progress traps' — alluring technologies serve immediate needs, but ransom the future. With intersecting stories from a Chinese car-driving club, a Wall Street insider who exposes an out-of-control, environmentally rapacious financial elite, and eco-cops defending a scorched Amazon, the film lays stark evidence before us. In the past, we could use up a region’s resources and move on. But if today’s global civilization collapses from over-consumption, that’s it. We have no back-up planet."

Friday, March 15, 2013

The Response of Aquatic Ecosystems to Human Activity

Assessing River Health with Ecosystem Function
RKC 111  A Lecture by Heather Bechtold, Candidate for the Science Position in Environmental Studies

Dr. Bechtold's research focuses on the effects of global change and human activity across the boundaries of terrestrial and stream ecosystems. Human induced stressors associated with land-use change such as agriculture, forest management and urbanization can alter how streams function (metabolism and nutrient cycling) and can be a source of novel contaminants, such as caffeine. Such inputs can alter the structure and function of stream biofilm (algal communities), which in turn may modify retention and export of these compounds from watersheds. Balancing the input of nutrients and contaminants are important to the health and function of aquatic ecosystems.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Candidate for the Tenure Track Position in Environmental and Urban Studies Program

“Urban Cultural Geography in New York City: Three Constellations of Privilege and Resistance”

Olin, Room 102  JEN JACK GIESEKING

Visiting Assistant Research Professor

The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Cultural geography illuminates how people relate to and define their spaces and places, and, in turn, how spaces and places relate to and define people. Cities are a rare environment in that they afford researchers ways to amplify our understandings of the processes, practices, and possibilities in these spaces as well as their effect on the world. Drawing from critical theoretical work in urban cultural geography, as well as spatial methods of ethnography and focus groups with mental mapping exercises, I examine three instances of what I call constellations, the interdependent flows of privilege and resistance to the oppression caused by uneven access to resources and power. These three examples include attempts at democracy and patterns of racism in housing co-ops; scaled constructions of access and power for students of an elite, rural college as they relate to the cities around them; and the boundaries of lesbians of color to find acceptance for their race, gender, and sexuality. Each site is bound to the next and those within them evidence tactics of resistance to produce justice and thwart oppression. These constellations help us to rethink territorial models of space- and place-making and elaborate the interconnectedness and complex political, economic, psychological and social systems of our everyday lives.

Jen Jack Gieseking is Visiting Assistant Research Professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and hold a PhD in environmental psychology. Her first book, People, Place, and Space: Key Readings across the Disciplines, brings together cutting edge readings on class and human-environment relations that speak to the ‘spatial turn’ across the social sciences. Forthcoming from Routledge in 2013, the volume's other editors include William Mangold, Cindi Katz, Setha Low, and Susan Saegert. She is presently writing her first authored book, Queer New York: Lesbians’ and Queer Women’s Experiences of Social and Spatial Justice in New York City, 1983-2008. Her research focuses on the co-production of urban space and identity; theories of critical and cultural geography; qualitative spatial methods; and expressions and experiences of justice and oppression. Jack has taught classes on social and spatial in/justice, immigration, urban sustainability, urban planning, spatial methods and analysis, and digital media. She can be found at jgieseking.org and @jgieseking.

Tuesday, March 5, 2013 – Friday, March 29, 2013

A Hudson River Journey: 1609-2109

A Riverkeeper Traveling Exhibit
Campus Center, George Ball Lounge  Riverkeeper developed this exhibit in 2009 in honor of the 400th anniversary of Henry Hudson’s voyage up the Hudson River. It contains original artwork, historic artifacts, maps and digital media. “A Hudson River Journey,” tells the history of stewardship inspired by the Hudson River, and the challenges and opportunities facing today’s river stewards. The panels tell the important story of the Hudson River from six distinct regions of the river (NY Harbor to Troy), and for three time periods: pre-contact (1609 and before), current era (industrial revolution to present day), and the future (2010 to 2109).

There will be a Riverkeeper presentation on March 5 a 11:50 AM as part of the EUS colloquium. The exhibit will be open to the public for the month of March.

Riverkeeper is a member-supported watchdog organization dedicated to defending the Hudson River and its tributaries and protecting the drinking water supply of nine million New York City and Hudson Valley residents. For more than 44 years Riverkeeper has been New York’s clean water advocate, helping to establish globally recognized standards for waterway and watershed protection and serving as the model and mentor for the growing Waterkeeper movement that includes nearly 200 Keeper programs across the country and around the globe.
For more information about “A Hudson River Journey” or to learn more about Riverkeeper’s programs, please contact their Outreach Coordinator, Dana Gulley, at dgulley@riverkeeper.org or 914-478-4501 x222 or visit them on the web at www.riverkeeper.org.

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Pavement to Paradox:
Can Urban Agriculture Help Solve Environmental and Urban Social Challenges?


RKC 103 

Kristin Reynolds, Ph.D.
EUS Candidate for Assistant Professor,
Tenure Track Position

Urban agriculture is often described as the growing of plants and livestock in and around cities. These activities, which may range from backyard and community gardens to commercial small-scale livestock husbandry, bring many benefits to city residents and the environment, and are increasingly looked to as a way to address the multiple needs of urban communities and municipalities. However, even as interest in urban agriculture, and its attendant benefits, expands to the point of being considered a social movement, there are increasing signs that social inequities may be reproduced within an urban agriculture system. And, there has been less research on the actual environmental impacts that city farming and gardening may produce. More information about these issues may elucidate ways in which city planning might consider urban agriculture as one strategy to address evolving social and environmental challenges.

This talk explores the benefits of urban agriculture, and some of the paradoxes that have often been overlooked in scholarly literature. It draws from two recent studies of urban agriculture systems, (in New York City and the San Francisco Bay area), to illustrate some of the common benefits and goals of city farmers and gardeners, and to pose questions that challenge the assumption that urban agriculture, as practiced, is a solution to more fundamental issues.

Kristin Reynolds is currently a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Sustainable Food Systems at The New School in New York City, where she has taught courses about urban agriculture, women and agroecosystems, and action research. Many of her courses integrate civic engagement projects co-designed with community partners, and she has worked on urban and rural farms in the U.S. and abroad. Dr. Reynolds also worked for five years with the University of California Small Farm Program, a statewide Cooperative Extension program for small-scale farmers, through which she conducted research and education about agricultural tourism and farm management for women and socially-disadvantaged farmers.

Dr. Reynolds’ current research focuses on urban agriculture and social justice in New York City, and the intersections between alternative food and food justice movements, and action research frameworks. She holds a PhD in Geography and a Masters in International Agricultural Development from the University of California, Davis; a BS in International Soil and Crop Sciences and a BA in French from Colorado State University.


Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium

Deborah Koons Garcia, filmmaker
Olin, Room 102  Deborah Koons Garcia will speak on her environmental film making, including the production of “Symphony of Soil” and “The Future of Food.” Garcia has a Master of Fine Arts from The San Francisco Art Institute. Her film production company, Lily Films, is located in Mill Valley, California. For the last ten years, she has focused primarily on films about agriculture and the food system. Her film, “The Future of Food” was a key element in passing Measure H in Mendocino County, California. This measure bans the planting of genetically engineered crops in the county. It is the first time U.S. citizens have voted on this important issue.

Monday, February 25, 2013

Film: Symphony of Soil


Jim Ottaway Jr. Film Center  Drawing from ancient knowledge and cutting edge science, Symphony of the Soil is an artistic exploration of the miraculous substance soil. By understanding the elaborate relationships and mutuality between soil, water, the atmosphere, plants and animals, we come to appreciate the complex and dynamic nature of this precious resource. The film also examines our human relationship with soil, the use and misuse of soil in agriculture, deforestation and development, and the latest scientific research on soil’s key role in ameliorating the most challenging environmental issues of our time. Filmed on four continents, featuring esteemed scientists and working farmers and ranchers, Symphony of the Soil is an intriguing presentation that highlights possibilities of healthy soil creating healthy plants creating healthy humans living on a healthy planet. Director and producer, Deborah Koons Garcia, will attend and answer questions.

Thursday, February 21, 2013 – Friday, March 1, 2013

Bard Science Journal Research Submission Deadline on March 1


Website  Anyone who is interested in submitting a scientific research paper or scientific review to be peer-reviewed should send in their submissions to bardsciencejournal@gmail.com by March 1st.

For more details on our submission guidelines, check out our tumblr at bardsciencejournal.tumblr.com or email us and ask for a pdf copy.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Bard Science Journal: Brainstorm Meeting for Next Issue


Reem-Kayden Center Booth Ferris Foundation Terrace Pod 222  Bard Science Journal staff will be meeting up to brainstorm article ideas for our next issue (out at the beginning of April). We'll also be talking about the possibility of science-related fim screenings happening on campus. People who are interested in writing articles, being on editorial staff, or who have questions about our submission policy should attend.

If you're unable to make the meeting or have any questions beforehand, please email us at bardsciencejournal@gmail.com.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Why did the salamander cross the road?

a slide presentation on the importance of forest and wetland habitats and about the "Amphibian Migrations and Road Crossings" volunteer project
Rhinebeck Town Hall 

AMPHIBIAN MIGRATIONS & ROAD CROSSINGS 
A Project of the NYSDEC Hudson River Estuary Program and Cornell University
http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/51925.html

Although cold winter temperatures are still in the forecast, today's warm sun certainly feels spring-y!  If you're new to the Amphibian Migrations & Road Crossings (AM&RC) project, you may be interested in an upcoming lecture on February 19 about woodland pools, forests, amphibians, and the volunteer AM&RC project.  Full details are below or at the following link: 
http://www.winnakeeland.org/2013_Amphi_Xing_Presentations_Rhinebeck.pdf


Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium

Speaker: Tom Wilber
Olin, Room 102  The focus of the spring Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium is: What does it mean to be an environmentalist? Prominent researchers in the field of environmental work, from activists to scholars, will present their work every week. Open to the public.

“Gas Rush: A Reporter’s Perspective.” Author Tom Wilber will provide an overview of high volume hydraulic fracturing and related issues, including lessons learned during the rush to develop the Marcellus Shale and Utica shales in northern Pennsylvania in 2008 through 2011. He will focus on rapidly changing current events and social influences that continue to play out -- market dynamics; the anti-fracking movement; Home Rule and other legal challenges; and local, state and national politics influencing regulations.

Wilber is the author of Under the Surface, Fracking Fortunes and the Fate of the Marcellus Shale and has been in the newspaper business for more than 20 years, including 17 years with the Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin, covering business, health, and environment beats. He has reported on shale gas development in New York and Pennsylvania since 2008; and he was among the first reporters to provide daily coverage of events in Dimock Pennsylvania, which have since become iconic of the national controversy over fracking. For that, he won top honors in Best of Gannett beat reporting in 2010. He now tracks current events related to shale as development in his blog, Shale Gas Review.


Thursday, February 7, 2013

TALK: Keeping it Green as it Flow Downstream

--free talk in Tivoli after the EUS Open House; ride available--
Tivoli Free Library 

DEC PROGRAM SERIES AT THE TIVOLI LIBRARY CONTINUES

The Hudson River Estuary, Keeping It “Green” As It Flows Down Stream


The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) Hudson River Research Reserve (Research Reserve) and the Village of Tivoli continue their monthly series entitled “Tivoli Bays Talks” on Thursday, February 7, 2013, from 7:30-8:30 p.m. Emily Vail and Andrew Meyer from the NYSDEC Hudson River Estuary Program will discuss the Hudson River Watershed and how tributaries connecting the landscape of the Hudson Valley affect the water quality of the Hudson River. They will also explain the basics of green infrastructure and how it can help improve water quality in the valley.

Green infrastructure practices maintain or restore storm water’s natural flow pattern by allowing water to slowly permeate the surface, irrigate plants and recharge the groundwater supply, rather than flow directly into our streams or water treatment plants.

“Tivoli Bays Talks” takes place seasonally on the first Thursday of the month in the Tivoli Bays Visitor Center. The center is located in the Watts dePeyster Hall, 86 Broadway, Tivoli, New York 12583. Programs cover a wide range of topics connecting the Tivoli Bays to the Village of Tivoli and the Hudson River. The visitor center is wheelchair accessible. Talks begin promptly. Admission is free. For directions or further information, call 845-889-4745 x109.

Tivoli Bays can be reached by footpath from the Tivoli Town Hall, and at designated access points.


For more information about the NYSDEC Hudson River Research Reserve:     
http://nerrs.noaa.gov/Reserve.aspx?ResID=HUD http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/4915.html                      

For more information about the NYSDEC Hudson River Estuary Program:   

 http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/4920.html


Thursday, February 7, 2013

Environmental and Urban Studies (EUS) Open House

EUS Welcomes You
Hegeman 102  Are you interested in EUS or already an EUS student?

This Open House is for all EUS students or students interested in EUS, to meet each other, meet faculty and staff members, learn about internships, and ask questions. There will be awesome snacks.

Points of interest:

Course options

Internships, fellowships, scholarships, grants

Canoes

Hegeman 102.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium

Speaker: John Cronin
Olin Humanities Building  The focus of the spring Environmental and Urban Studies Colloquium is: What does it mean to be an environmentalist? Prominent researchers in the field of environmental work, from activists to scholars, will present their work. Open to the public.

Feb 5 speaker: John Cronin will discuss his 38 years dedicated to the environment and to innovation. Cronin has worked as an advocate, legislative and congressional aide, commercial fisherman, professor, author and filmmaker. He is known internationally for his Hudson River work, for which the Wall Street Journal called him "a unique presence on America's major waterways." He was the Hudson’s original Riverkeeper and the founder and CEO of the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries. Time magazine named him a “Hero for the Planet” and People magazine described him as “equal parts detective, scientist and public advocate.”


Thursday, January 31, 2013 – Saturday, February 2, 2013

Conference: Waters, Forests, and Communities in Asia


This conference focuses on how field experiences, cross-university connections, and NGO linkages inform higher education curricula in Asian studies, environmental studies, and other relevant disciplines, across departments, and between the undergraduate and graduate programs. 

Please see the conference website for more information: http://www.bard.edu/news/conferences/asia2013/.